Architecture

Green-roofed Mexican home constructed from concrete and fallen timber

Green-roofed Mexican home cons...
The arms of the Casa de la Roca meet in the middle at a central node that is outdoors, yet protected from the elements by a roof and walls on either side
The arms of the Casa de la Roca meet in the middle at a central node that is outdoors, yet protected from the elements by a roof and walls on either side
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Tucked away in the wooded hillside near Mexico’s Valle de Bravo, a unique new tripod-shaped home has taken shape
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Tucked away in the wooded hillside near Mexico’s Valle de Bravo, a unique new tripod-shaped home has taken shape
The Y-shaped Casa de la Roca was designed by Barcelona and Mexico-based architecture firm Cadaval & Solà-Morales
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The Y-shaped Casa de la Roca was designed by Barcelona and Mexico-based architecture firm Cadaval & Solà-Morales
The Casa de la Roca makes use of a "huge amount" of reclaimed timber
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The Casa de la Roca makes use of a "huge amount" of reclaimed timber
The Casa de la Roca goes to some lengths to blend in its natural environment
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The Casa de la Roca goes to some lengths to blend in its natural environment
For the materials, the designers of the Casa de la Roca began with trusty ol’ concrete due to its high structural performance, longevity and minimal need for maintenance
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For the materials, the designers of the Casa de la Roca began with trusty ol’ concrete due to its high structural performance, longevity and minimal need for maintenance
The Casa de la Roca was designed in a Y shape in an effort to make the most of its picturesque surroundings
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The Casa de la Roca was designed in a Y shape in an effort to make the most of its picturesque surroundings
Steps leading up to the Casa de la Roca
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Steps leading up to the Casa de la Roca
The Casa de la Roca boasts magnificent valley views
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The Casa de la Roca boasts magnificent valley views
The Casa de la Roca near Mexico’s Valle de Bravo
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The Casa de la Roca near Mexico’s Valle de Bravo
The arms of the Casa de la Roca meet in the middle at a central node that is outdoors, yet protected from the elements by a roof and walls on either side
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The arms of the Casa de la Roca meet in the middle at a central node that is outdoors, yet protected from the elements by a roof and walls on either side
The Casa de la Roca from afar
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The Casa de la Roca from afar
Ceramic is also used throughout the ceiling of the Casa de la Roca, as an important structural component to consolidate the timber beams
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Ceramic is also used throughout the ceiling of the Casa de la Roca, as an important structural component to consolidate the timber beams
Indoor and outdoor areas of the Casa de la Roca
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Indoor and outdoor areas of the Casa de la Roca
The Casa de la Roca was designed in a Y shape in an effort to make the most of its picturesque surroundings
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The Casa de la Roca was designed in a Y shape in an effort to make the most of its picturesque surroundings
The arms of the Casa de la Roca meet in the middle at a central node that is outdoors, yet protected from the elements by a roof and walls on either side
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The arms of the Casa de la Roca meet in the middle at a central node that is outdoors, yet protected from the elements by a roof and walls on either side
The Casa de la Roca goes to some lengths to blend in its natural environment
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The Casa de la Roca goes to some lengths to blend in its natural environment
For the materials, the designers of the Casa de la Roca began with trusty ol’ concrete due to its high structural performance, longevity and minimal need for maintenance
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For the materials, the designers of the Casa de la Roca began with trusty ol’ concrete due to its high structural performance, longevity and minimal need for maintenance
Each end of the Y-shaped Casa de la Roca has a room with a floor-to-ceiling window
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Each end of the Y-shaped Casa de la Roca has a room with a floor-to-ceiling window
The Casa de la Roca makes use of a "huge amount" of reclaimed timber
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The Casa de la Roca makes use of a "huge amount" of reclaimed timber
Tucked away in the wooded hillside near Mexico’s Valle de Bravo, a unique new tripod-shaped home has taken shape
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Tucked away in the wooded hillside near Mexico’s Valle de Bravo, a unique new tripod-shaped home has taken shape
The Y-shaped Casa de la Roca was designed by Barcelona and Mexico-based architecture firm Cadaval & Solà-Morales
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The Y-shaped Casa de la Roca was designed by Barcelona and Mexico-based architecture firm Cadaval & Solà-Morales
The Casa de la Roca boasts magnificent valley views
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The Casa de la Roca boasts magnificent valley views
Bathroom inside the Casa de la Roca
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Bathroom inside the Casa de la Roca
Bedroom inside the Casa de la Roca
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Bedroom inside the Casa de la Roca
Bedroom with a view inside the Casa de la Roca
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Bedroom with a view inside the Casa de la Roca
Ceramic is also used throughout the ceiling of the Casa de la Roca, as an important structural component to consolidate the timber beams
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Ceramic is also used throughout the ceiling of the Casa de la Roca, as an important structural component to consolidate the timber beams
The black paint of the Casa de la Roca is also an effort to blend in with the landscape, with the architects aiming for a “certain anonymity in front of the vegetation and exuberant views.”
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The black paint of the Casa de la Roca is also an effort to blend in with the landscape, with the architects aiming for a “certain anonymity in front of the vegetation and exuberant views.”
The black paint of the Casa de la Roca is also an effort to blend in with the landscape, with the architects aiming for a “certain anonymity in front of the vegetation and exuberant views”
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The black paint of the Casa de la Roca is also an effort to blend in with the landscape, with the architects aiming for a “certain anonymity in front of the vegetation and exuberant views”
The Casa de la Roca boasts magnificent valley views
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The Casa de la Roca boasts magnificent valley views
Greenery surrounds the Casa de la Roca
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Greenery surrounds the Casa de la Roca
Greenery surrounds the Casa de la Roca
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Greenery surrounds the Casa de la Roca
Front on view of the Casa de la Roca
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Front on view of the Casa de la Roca
Sleeping quarters inside the Casa de la Roca
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Sleeping quarters inside the Casa de la Roca
The Casa de la Roca was designed in a Y shape in an effort to make the most of its picturesque surroundings
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The Casa de la Roca was designed in a Y shape in an effort to make the most of its picturesque surroundings
Modern kitchen inside the Casa de la Roca
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Modern kitchen inside the Casa de la Roca
Steps leading up to the Casa de la Roca
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Steps leading up to the Casa de la Roca
For the materials, the designers of the Casa de la Roca began with trusty ol’ concrete due to its high structural performance, longevity and minimal need for maintenance
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For the materials, the designers of the Casa de la Roca began with trusty ol’ concrete due to its high structural performance, longevity and minimal need for maintenance
The Casa de la Roca goes to some lengths to blend in its natural environment
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The Casa de la Roca goes to some lengths to blend in its natural environment
The Casa de la Roca makes use of a "huge amount" of reclaimed timber
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The Casa de la Roca makes use of a "huge amount" of reclaimed timber
Panoramic view of the Casa de la Roca and its surroundings
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Panoramic view of the Casa de la Roca and its surroundings
Each end of the Y-shaped Casa de la Roca has a room with a floor-to-ceiling window
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Each end of the Y-shaped Casa de la Roca has a room with a floor-to-ceiling window
Tucked away in the wooded hillside near Mexico’s Valle de Bravo, a unique new tripod-shaped home has taken shape
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Tucked away in the wooded hillside near Mexico’s Valle de Bravo, a unique new tripod-shaped home has taken shape
The Casa de la Roca is shaped like a tripod
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The Casa de la Roca is shaped like a tripod
The Y-shaped Casa de la Roca was designed by Barcelona and Mexico-based architecture firm Cadaval & Solà-Morales
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The Y-shaped Casa de la Roca was designed by Barcelona and Mexico-based architecture firm Cadaval & Solà-Morales
Aerial view of the Casa de la Roca
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Aerial view of the Casa de la Roca

Tucked away in the wooded hillside near Mexico's Valle de Bravo, a unique new tripod-shaped home has taken shape. Topped by a green roof with magnificent valley views, the Casa de la Roca goes to some lengths to blend into its natural environment, most notably by way of the timber reclaimed from the forest floor that forms an integral part of its structure.

The Y-shaped home was designed by Barcelona and Mexico-based architecture firm Cadaval & Solà-Morales, which isn't averse to a little alphabetical inspiration with its spectacular X House another to grab our attention back in 2013.

Designing the Casa de la Roca house in this way was an effort to make the most of its picturesque setting. Each arm of the "Y" leads to a room at its end, each with large floor-to-ceiling windows for easy enjoyment of the heavily forested surroundings and valley. These arms meet in the middle at a central node that is outdoors, yet protected from the elements by a roof and walls on either side.

The arms of the Casa de la Roca meet in the middle at a central node that is outdoors, yet protected from the elements by a roof and walls on either side
The arms of the Casa de la Roca meet in the middle at a central node that is outdoors, yet protected from the elements by a roof and walls on either side

For the materials, the team began with trusty ol' concrete due to its high structural performance, longevity and low maintenance. It also plays nicely with the local climate and creates a thermal mass for the home in the cooler months, while the large windows create opportunities for cross ventilation in the warmer months.

More impressive is the use of a "huge amount" of reclaimed wood, gathered from the fallen trees in the area. This upcycled timber forms an important part of the structure by serving as the cross beams for the roof, which are left exposed on the inside to create a "very emphatic and directional rhythm."

The Casa de la Roca boasts magnificent valley views
The Casa de la Roca boasts magnificent valley views

Ceramic is also used throughout the ceiling as an important structural component to consolidate the timber beams, together holding up a shrubbery-covered roof that further melds the home with the natural landscape. The black paint is also an effort to blend in, with the architects choosing the color for a "certain anonymity in front of the vegetation and exuberant views."

The Y-shaped Casa de la Roca was designed by Barcelona and Mexico-based architecture firm Cadaval & Solà-Morales
The Y-shaped Casa de la Roca was designed by Barcelona and Mexico-based architecture firm Cadaval & Solà-Morales

To see more of the impressive Casa de la Roca, take a look through our gallery.

Source: Cadaval & Solà-Morales

1 comment
ljaques
Pretty cool house in a beautiful area. I think I'd have gone with shorter (normal) ceiling heights and windows. And I'd have put the chimney caps taller, away from the weeds, thanks. And I like brown much better than black, so a nice mahogany or chestnut would have it blending with the forest much better, as well as reducing the solar load during summer.