Military

British carrier HMS Queen Elizabeth commissioned

British carrier HMS Queen Eliz...
HMS Queen Elizabeth is the largest ship ever built for the Royal Navy
HMS Queen Elizabeth is the largest ship ever built for the Royal Navy
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HMS Queen Elizabeth is the largest ship ever built for the Royal Navy
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HMS Queen Elizabeth is the largest ship ever built for the Royal Navy
HMS Queen Elizabeth will fly the F-35B fighter planes
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HMS Queen Elizabeth will fly the F-35B fighter planes
HMS Queen Elizabeth entering her home port of Portsmouth
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HMS Queen Elizabeth entering her home port of Portsmouth
The ships company parading at the ceremony
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The ships company parading at the ceremony
Captain Jerry Kyd, Queen Elizabeth, and Princess Anne
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Captain Jerry Kyd, Queen Elizabeth, and Princess Anne
The commissioning ceremony took place on the hangar deck of HMS Queen Elizabeth
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The commissioning ceremony took place on the hangar deck of HMS Queen Elizabeth
The white ensign was raised, signifying that HMS Queen Elizabeth is now an active member of the fleet
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The white ensign was raised, signifying that HMS Queen Elizabeth is now an active member of the fleet
Captain Kyd signing the commissioning articles
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Captain Kyd signing the commissioning articles
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The British supercarrier HMS Queen Elizabeth officially joined the Royal Navy today at Portsmouth naval base. On the hangar deck of the 65,000-tonne (71,650-ton) ship, her Lady Sponsor, Queen Elizabeth II, formally oversaw the ceremony as Captain Jerry Kyd, the Commanding Officer, read the commissioning warrant that confirmed the future flagship as an active part of the fleet and the White Ensign and commissioning pennants were raised for the first time.

The £3-billion (US$3.8-billion) HMS Queen Elizabeth is currently at her berth at Princess Royal Jetty, which will also act as host to her sister ship, HMS Prince of Wales, which is currently being fitted out at Rosyth, Scotland. The commissioning ceremony was attended by Princess Anne, Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson, Chancellor Philip Hammond, military chiefs, and the Queen Elizabeth's company.

The carrier recently completed the second stage of her sea trials in the English Channel and the Ministry of Defence says she will carry out the first of a series of helicopter trials early next year before setting sail for the United States in the third quarter of 2018 for further sea trials.

The ships company parading at the ceremony
The ships company parading at the ceremony

About 150 Royal Navy and RAF personnel are training aboard US Marine Corps assault carriers both to prepare for the delivery of the first 13 F-35B fighters to the Queen Elizabeth and to allow the British and US fighting forces to learn to work as a team capable of operating from one another's ships. The first F-35s are scheduled to fly from the British strike carrier next year. These will be joined by a complement of Wildcat and Merlin helicopters.

"Today marks the start of a hugely significant chapter for the Royal Navy, and indeed the nation, as the future flagship is commissioned into Her Majesty's fleet," says Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson. "It is an honor to witness the crowning moment of an extraordinarily busy year for the Royal Navy that has seen us name the second carrier, HMS Prince of Wales, cut steel on the first Type 26 frigates and launch the National Shipbuilding Strategy.

"Our new aircraft carrier is the epitome of British design and dexterity, at the core of our efforts to build an Armed Forces fit for the future. For the next half a century both carriers will advance our interests around the globe, providing the most visible symbol of our intent and commitment to protect the UK from intensifying threats, wherever they may come from."

Source: Royal Navy

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2 comments
Nik
Putin's comment was probably the most pertinent, ''It will make a good target'' or words to that effect. This potential pile of scrap metal has no anti missile defences, and will have to rely on other ships to protect it. So, a submarine fires a salvo of torpedoes, and the protection ships have a choice, stay put and be hit, or avoid the torpedoes and sacrifice the carrier. Also there are intercontinental ballistic missiles, that have been re-purposed as anti-ship missiles, that are unstoppable by any present anti missile defence systems. This could be regarded as the most expensive floating coffin ever constructed. Britains Navy has a history of sending coffins to war, from 'The Mighty Hood' in WW2, to the six ships lost in the Falklands war. Good luck to all who sail on her, indeed!
JimFox
Nik-- Don't disagree entirely but your analogies are way off. The 'Mighty Hood' was a 21 year old battle cruiser when sunk by Bismarck, the most modern German battleship. The six ships lost in the Falklands were all sunk by aircraft, I think. These two carriers are ill-conceived, biggest ever built for the RN at a time when small vessels in large numbers seem more appropriate. They main protection will be as for all carriers, their own aircraft plus at least two nuclear attack submarines & surface vessels. Hard to imagine their survival unless they stay well clear of action...