Computers

Logitech's MX Ergo says scram to cramps and brings back the trackball

Logitech's MX Ergo says scram ...
Logitech has announced the MX Ergo, its newest wireless trackball
Logitech has announced the MX Ergo, its newest wireless trackball
View 2 Images
Logitech's MX Ergo has an adjustable metal hinge, allowing it to be set to sit flush against the desk, or raised up to 20 degrees
1/2
Logitech's MX Ergo has an adjustable metal hinge, allowing it to be set to sit flush against the desk, or raised up to 20 degrees
Logitech has announced the MX Ergo, its newest wireless trackball
2/2
Logitech has announced the MX Ergo, its newest wireless trackball

Using a computer mouse day after day can be a bit cramp-inducing, so to help take the strain off Logitech is launching the MX Ergo, its first trackball in years. The device has been refined from previous models for extra comfort, including a hinge to adjust its angle.

As its name suggests, the Ergo is made to be ergonomic, with Logitech saying it has been sculpted to fully support the user's palm and fingers. Combined with a soft rubber layer on the top, the device can apparently reduce muscular strain by 20 percent, compared to a regular old computer mouse.

Apart from its general shape, that comfort comes from the fact that the Ergo itself stays still on the desk: users just twiddle the trackball with their thumb to move the cursor on the screen. There's an adjustable metal hinge underneath too, which allows users to either leave the device flat on the surface or prop it up on a 20-degree angle.

Logitech's MX Ergo has an adjustable metal hinge, allowing it to be set to sit flush against the desk, or raised up to 20 degrees
Logitech's MX Ergo has an adjustable metal hinge, allowing it to be set to sit flush against the desk, or raised up to 20 degrees

Alongside the standard left and right mouse buttons, the Ergo's scroll wheel also acts as a middle click for shortcuts, and can be nudged to the sides to allow for side-to-side scrolling. Pressing the precision button on the side of the device allows users to quickly adjust the cursor speed and sensitivity.

The Ergo connects to Windows or Mac devices via Bluetooth, and to save users pairing and re-pairing it between several regularly-used devices, it's compatible with Logitech Easy-Switch. This system means that it can be paired with two devices at once, and switching between them is done on the fly by pressing a button on the middle of the Ergo.

Battery life is reportedly four months on a full charge, and it can be quickly recharged: Logitech says that plugging it in for one minute tops up the battery enough for a full day's use.

The MX Ergo is available now for US$99.99. Logitech outlines its features in the video below.

Source: Logitech

Logitech MX ERGO Advanced Wireless Trackball

4 comments
Dan Lewis
Well, it's nice, but it's still not right. Anybody really serious about ergonomics knows that the hand should be in a 'hand shake' position, not palm down. Years ago I got a block of modeling clay and put a customized groove in it so that my trackball mouse could be rolled over to the 'hand shake' position. One wonders why Logitech can't do the industrial mass produced version. Oh well.
ljaques
Dan, I cut my computer eye-teeth with Logitech Trackman Portable trackballs because of early problems with carpal pain when using a normal mouse or regular trackball. They were in vertical mode with the ball on the left (reversible) for the thumb and the left mouse button on top. After my 3rd one went belly up and my 6th IBM clone of it died, I found the Logitech M570, which is almost identical to this new MX-Ergo. $27 on Amazon. They work to keep my arm down (no trapezius pain) and my wrist unbent (no carpal pain). I don't know why Logitech phased out the Trackman Portable, but it was probably economics.
Jeff V
I have enjoyed a similar mouse in the past, but 1) your taste may vary and 2) unless they're using a non-contact way to detect ball movement, the contacts will get dirty just like ball mice of old.
Gregg Eshelman
Someone needs to revive the Microsoft Trackball Optical 1.0 - but use silicon carbide bearing points instead of steel. If you aren't meticulous about keeping your right thumb clean, and the trackball's ball clean, the steel balls get flat spots worn on them pretty quick then the ball drags in the socket. Some people were charging big $ to replace the worn steel bearings with silicon carbide, especially after Microsoft discontinued it. And while they're reviving it MAKE A LEFT HAND VERSION!