Architecture

Quirky green-roofed home features kid's slide

Quirky green-roofed home featu...
MaHouse comprises a total floorspace of 340 sq m (3,659 sq ft) spread over three main floors
MaHouse comprises a total floorspace of 340 sq m (3,659 sq ft) spread over three main floors
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The home is located in Strasbourg, France
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The home is located in Strasbourg, France
Each of the three stacked volumes features a green roof
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Each of the three stacked volumes features a green roof
The luxury home was constructed from 2012 to 2015
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The luxury home was constructed from 2012 to 2015
MaHouse is located in a challengingly narrow plot
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MaHouse is located in a challengingly narrow plot
TheVeryMany maxed out the allowable zoning envelope and stacked three slightly offset volumes
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TheVeryMany maxed out the allowable zoning envelope and stacked three slightly offset volumes
The Reglit Glass glows like a lantern at night
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The Reglit Glass glows like a lantern at night
TheVeryMany sought to add plenty of natural light inside by cladding the criss-cross staircase with Reglit Glass
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TheVeryMany sought to add plenty of natural light inside by cladding the criss-cross staircase with Reglit Glass
The Reglit Glass obscures the view inside
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The Reglit Glass obscures the view inside
MaHouse comprises a total floorspace of 340 sq m (3,659 sq ft) spread over three main floors
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MaHouse comprises a total floorspace of 340 sq m (3,659 sq ft) spread over three main floors
The ground floor features the home's shared spaces, including kitchen, lounge, dining area and master bathroom
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The ground floor features the home's shared spaces, including kitchen, lounge, dining area and master bathroom
View to the kitchen
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View to the kitchen
The home's long staircase boasts a narrow slide suitable for kids
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The home's long staircase boasts a narrow slide suitable for kids
The ground floor features the home's shared spaces, including kitchen, lounge, dining area and master bathroom
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The ground floor features the home's shared spaces, including kitchen, lounge, dining area and master bathroom
Constructing MaHouse
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Constructing MaHouse
Constructing MaHouse
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Constructing MaHouse
Constructing MaHouse
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Constructing MaHouse
Constructing MaHouse
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Constructing MaHouse
Architectural plan of MaHouse
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Architectural plan of MaHouse
Architectural plan of MaHouse
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Architectural plan of MaHouse
Architectural plan of MaHouse
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Architectural plan of MaHouse
Architectural plan of MaHouse
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Architectural plan of MaHouse
Architectural plan of MaHouse
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Architectural plan of MaHouse
Architectural plan of MaHouse
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Architectural plan of MaHouse
Architectural plan of MaHouse
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Architectural plan of MaHouse
The slide in action
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The slide in action
View gallery - 25 images

Marc Fornes-led firm TheVeryMany was required to employ a few clever techniques to shoehorn a light-filled 340 sq m (3,659 sq ft) four-bedroom luxury home into a challenging plot in Strasbourg, France. Dubbed MaHouse, the home was completed in January, 2015.

Comprising three stacked and misaligned volumes, each sporting a green roof, MaHouse was constructed over three years in a narrow plot in Strasbourg's center. It's no super-skinny Imai House by any means, but for an architect-designed luxury home, the situation was far from ideal.

TheVeryMany maxed out the zoning envelope to the legal limit to make it work. The firm even went so far as to calculate the minimum achievable clearance height of the owners' cars in the underground garage to maximize space in the house (presumably there isn't much chance of them swapping their Mini for a Hummer).

MaHouse's three volumes feature the master bedroom suite on the uppermost floor, while three bedrooms, plus a playroom are located on the middle floor. Most of the shared spaces, including kitchen, lounge, and dining area are based on the ground floor.

The slide in action
The slide in action

In a fun touch that's sure to cause some bruises and scraped knees, to get from the playroom to the kitchen the kids in the house can make use of a narrow slide integrated into the eye-catching long staircase.

Since MaHouse is overlooked by several other properties and bordered by an alleyway, TheVeryMany sought to maximize natural light by lining the staircase with Reglit Glass, which obscures the view from prying eyes. The glass also glows pleasantly like a lantern at night.

Source: TheVeryMany

Marc Fornes-led firm TheVeryMany was required to employ a few clever techniques to shoehorn a light-filled 340 sq m (3,659 sq ft) four-bedroom luxury home into a challenging plot in Strasbourg, France. Dubbed MaHouse, the home was completed in January, 2015.

Comprising three stacked and misaligned volumes, each sporting a green roof, MaHouse was constructed over three years in a narrow plot in Strasbourg's center. It's no super-skinny Imai House by any means, but for an architect-designed luxury home, the situation was far from ideal.

TheVeryMany maxed out the zoning envelope to the legal limit to make it work. The firm even went so far as to calculate the minimum achievable clearance height of the owners' cars in the underground garage to maximize space in the house (presumably there isn't much chance of them swapping their Mini for a Hummer).

MaHouse's three volumes feature the master bedroom suite on the uppermost floor, while three bedrooms, plus a playroom are located on the middle floor. Most of the shared spaces, including kitchen, lounge, and dining area are based on the ground floor.

The slide in action
The slide in action

In a fun touch that's sure to cause some bruises and scraped knees, to get from the playroom to the kitchen the kids in the house can make use of a narrow slide integrated into the eye-catching long staircase.

Since MaHouse is overlooked by several other properties and bordered by an alleyway, TheVeryMany sought to maximize natural light by lining the staircase with Reglit Glass, which obscures the view from prying eyes. The glass also glows pleasantly like a lantern at night.

Source: TheVeryMany

View gallery - 25 images
4 comments
zr2s10
That looks insanely unsafe... Yeah, cause I want my kids zipping past dozens of stair corners he could hit and bust his head open! Nice concept, but jeez, if you're going to spend the money to build this thing, at least put a smooth edge along both sides of the slide. Oh, and WHY isn't it wide enough for adults? My youngest is too little to slide on her own, plus, you know, I may want to ride sometimes too, lol.
tigerprincess
The exact thoughts came to me. Also I notice no handrail on either side of the stairwell. I would have put up a short wall along the slide side of the stairway that would have acted as a handrail and a protection for the knees head etc of the slide patrons.
David V
Don't agree. Why need a handrail ? Look at the slope - judging from the bottom steps it's not steep. The steps are long so the slope is shallow. The boy going down the slide won't be going down fast and his head is way above the step level. Also he can't hit his head - or knees on the corners - there are no corners going down. Just flats. If he hits his head once - he won't do it twice (providing he survives !).
You can't take the danger out of everything. I'm actually inclined to think that the slide will teach the child to be more careful to not bang his arms going down. Have fun but be aware of the dangers and I don't see parents deliberately putting their children in danger.
On the house front - I love it. It's huge ! What a great use of space. Although low ceilings can be a bit claustophobic. And low garage ceilings can make opening the boot difficult without banging it.
I want one !
bill
I bet that wasn't designed to be a slide. It's just the side of the stairs (like the other side) that some kid decided to slide down. How does a minor construction detail become a sales feature?