Marine

Ingenity day boat dunks electric skateboard tech in the water

Ingenity day boat dunks electr...
The Ingenity 22E is capable of hitting a top speed of 26 knots, but Ingenity doesn't estimate how long it will be out on the water at that speed
The Ingenity 22E is capable of hitting a top speed of 26 knots, but Ingenity doesn't estimate how long it will be out on the water at that speed
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The Ingenity 22E electric boat can cruise for up to 14 hours at low speeds, the company claims
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The Ingenity 22E electric boat can cruise for up to 14 hours at low speeds, the company claims
Unlike Ingenity's last boat, the 22E is designed not for speed but for slow, casual cruising
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Unlike Ingenity's last boat, the 22E is designed not for speed but for slow, casual cruising
The Ingenity 22E is capable of hitting a top speed of 26 knots, but Ingenity doesn't estimate how long it will be out on the water at that speed
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The Ingenity 22E is capable of hitting a top speed of 26 knots, but Ingenity doesn't estimate how long it will be out on the water at that speed
The center aisle runs straight through from bow to stern, allowing for easy maneuvering on board
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The center aisle runs straight through from bow to stern, allowing for easy maneuvering on board
On board the Ingenity 22E
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On board the Ingenity 22E
The 22E features some of the latest tech, including OTA updates, a control touchscreen and app-based monitoring
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The 22E features some of the latest tech, including OTA updates, a control touchscreen and app-based monitoring
Blue waters and blue skies
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Blue waters and blue skies
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Going from water sports action to luxury cruising, and moving from the waters of Tahoe to the shores of Miami, Florida's Ingenity has followed up its rowdy electric Super Air Nautique 22E multi-sport boat with the more humble 23E day boat. Along the way, it's borrowed some lingo from the electric car industry, basing the new boat around a "modular skateboard" that could serve as the basis for a whole family of models. By packaging its e-drive hardware below the waterline, it's also created a cleaner, more spacious triple-lounge deck for the captain and his or her 10 closest friends to enjoy during long, electric-driven days on the water.

With a 126-kWh battery pack, the new 23E only carries two extra kilowatt-hours of capacity compared to what the GS22E was holding when we looked at it in 2021. But since it's tuned for full-day cruising as opposed to fast, furious, adrenaline-driven water sports, the 23E can stay out on the water for as long as 14 hours during low-speed cruising, according to Ingenity. The GS22E, on the other hand, hits the water with a mere two- to three-hour runtime estimate. The 23E's forward-facing sterndrive is engineered for confident low-speed maneuverability, safety and performance.

The Ingenity 22E electric boat can cruise for up to 14 hours at low speeds, the company claims
The Ingenity 22E electric boat can cruise for up to 14 hours at low speeds, the company claims

Those who simply must punch the throttle and show off their quiet, capable e-boat for their water-top neighbors can expect the 23E to accelerate up to 26 knots (48 km/h). It just won't be doing those sprints all day.

As its name suggests, the 23-foot (7-m) 23E measures a foot (30 cm) longer than the GS22E, but the two boats are of near-identical 24-ft (7.3-m) length with their stern platforms taken into account. Despite their similarity in size, the two boats are very different in appearance, each featuring a purpose-driven design. The 23E has a big-boned, broad-hulled build clearly aimed at on-water stability and comfort, not speed or sport.

Unlike Ingenity's last boat, the 22E is designed not for speed but for slow, casual cruising
Unlike Ingenity's last boat, the 22E is designed not for speed but for slow, casual cruising

In comparing the 23E to previous work, Ingenity president Sean Marrero sums up, "With the 23E, we can now take the knowledge we have about electric boating and apply it to the larger group of people who prefer being on the water instead of in the water."

On deck, the 23E accommodates 11 passengers comfortably in three individual seating areas. The foredeck combines a pair of vis-a-vis sofas into a particularly spacious area. The aisle separating these two sofas extends all the way back to the stern, and passengers can open up the wind gate to walk straight through, end to end. The aft deck has a pair of rear-facing seats set over top the stern platform, and the midship cockpit houses the remainder of the seats behind a wraparound windscreen.

The center aisle runs straight through from bow to stern, allowing for easy maneuvering on board
The center aisle runs straight through from bow to stern, allowing for easy maneuvering on board

The cockpit plays host to a touchscreen command center with telematics system and over-the-air updates. An accompanying app allows for remote charge and location monitoring.

The 23E's battery charges in as little as an hour and a half at an 80-kW supercharger or four hours at a 25-kW DC fast-charger. If you're in no rush to get back onto the water, you can standard-charge the battery to full from a 240-V/50-A hookup in 10 hours or so.

The 23E made its world premiere at this week's Miami International Boat Show and is available for preorder now. At US$235,000, it's unlikely to be the most common boat on waterways, but it will certainly be one of the quietest and cleanest. And with its modular platform, perhaps better termed an electric "surfboard" than "skateboard," Ingenity has a foundation for the development of future products.

Source: Ingenity

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5 comments
5 comments
paul314
I wonder what the maintenance costs of an electric boat are, compared to an internal-combustion one. Might end up being a hole in the water into which one pours somewhat less money.
BlueOak
Seems like, with the insanely high prices of ICE outboard motors, electric boats would be a real opportunity. But then there’s that production volume issue - low volume/startup = crazy high price.
Username
11 passengers ? This is like went they claim an rv or a boat can sleep "up to" a ridiculous number. Based on the pictures it looks that 8 is the maximum comfortable number.
Aross
I would love to see the breakdown of from where this massive cost comes. Since a fully decked out pontoon boat would cost a little more than 10% of this one where does the other cost get dumped?
Dan Lewis
Enough room for 11 people...that love each other dearly.