Marine

Mercury makes waves with first V12 outboard engine

Mercury makes waves with first...
The V12 Verado's steerable gear case and stationary engine body allows for more compact mounting than would otherwise be possible
The V12 Verado's steerable gear case and stationary engine body allows for more compact mounting than would otherwise be possible
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Mercury reveals its all-new flagship V12 Verado
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Mercury reveals its all-new flagship V12 Verado
The Mercury V12 Verado puts out up to 600 hp
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The Mercury V12 Verado puts out up to 600 hp
The twin-prop gear cases steer left or right while the rest of the engine remains stationary
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The twin-prop gear cases steer left or right while the rest of the engine remains stationary
A strut-assisted hatch makes for easy service
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A strut-assisted hatch makes for easy service
The V12 Verado's steerable gear case and stationary engine body allows for more compact mounting than would otherwise be possible
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The V12 Verado's steerable gear case and stationary engine body allows for more compact mounting than would otherwise be possible
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Mercury Marine recently pulled the covers off an all-new flagship, a powerful hunk of water-dipped muscle it bills as the world's first V12 outboard engine. The naturally aspirated 7.6-liter V12 Verado produces 600 hp, and unlike with an automotive V12, boatbuilders can mount several to the back of their vessels, spiking total horsepower into the thousands. A two-speed transmission and steerable gearcase help sea captains put all that muscle to the most efficient use.

Along with up to 600 horses, the V12 Verado provides plenty of torque to get heavy vessels moving and accelerating up to rated speed. A two-speed automatic transmission, which Mercury calls an industry first for outboards, helps the engine optimize rpms. First gear is 20 percent lower than second gear, sending maximum torque to the propellers for the quickest acceleration from standstill. The switch over to second gear happens without a perceptible clunk, seamlessly shifting over for efficient cruising and/or top speed attainment.

The Mercury V12 Verado puts out up to 600 hp
The Mercury V12 Verado puts out up to 600 hp

"With boats continuing to grow bigger and performance expectations continuing to rise, boaters have been asking for a better, more capable high‑horsepower solution to meet their needs," says Chris Drees, Mercury Marine president. "The V12 Verado outboard is Mercury’s answer."

The newest Verado has been calibrated to offer full performance on 87-octane fuel, and features like the dual contra-rotating propellers and hydrodynamic design help to optimize fuel economy and vessel range. The advanced range optimization (APO) system helps out by adjusting fuel delivery to maximize efficiency during cruising. According to the company, testing a dual-V12 Verado setup on an 11.5-ton 43-foot (13.1-m) day boat resulted in a 20 percent fuel economy boost at a set cruising speed versus a triple-425-hp-outboard setup from a competitor.

The twin-prop gear cases steer left or right while the rest of the engine remains stationary
The twin-prop gear cases steer left or right while the rest of the engine remains stationary

The V12 Verado's new steering system keeps the bulk of the engine completely stationary while the twin-propeller gearcase in the water rotates to shift direction. This design increases available steering movement to 45 degrees in each direction, delivering precise maneuverability at slow speeds and responsive handling out on the water. It also allows multiple V12 Verados to be mounted more closely together, letting boatbuilders pack on the power. The new engine has a minimum dry weight of 1,260 lb (572 kg).

Mercury promises a quiet, smooth ride despite the V12 Verado's large size and power. It claims that the 600-hp V12 Verado has the same noise and vibration levels as the 300-hp V8 Verado.

Mercury will launch the V12 Verado this (Northern hemisphere) spring.

Source: Mercury Marine

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9 comments
Bob Stuart
What does it weigh? Two strokes or four? What are the propeller options for different boats?
Expanded Viewpoint
What, Mercury couldn't supply a few pictures of what the internals look like? Not even a phantom drawing or two? No mention being made of how they achieved the performance levels being bragged about here?

Randy
Sam Sadovnik
To the guy asking if this is a two or four stroke, it's a four stroke.
ljaques
If you have to ask, you can't afford the weight, the size, or the price. ;) 1,260 lbs is a lotta weight for an outboard engine. 4-stroke, 4 valves per cylinder, contra-rotating propellers. It's amazing tech, and I'll bet they wanted to put a second comma in the price tag but couldn't. For more info: https://is.gdlMpLfA and https://www.mercurymarine.com/en/us/v12/ (the latter an extremely slow load at 5mbps here)
Nelson Hyde Chick
We should be ditching ICE motors for electric, not finding bigger ways to burn more oil.
Paul
Funny how they designed this amazing 600hp V12 outboard motor "all-new flagship, a powerful hunk of water-dipped muscle it bills as the world's first V12 outboard engine."
And the only photo supplied is a boat at anchor with a couple drinking wine. Lazy Press release IMO.
Nobody
Motors like this amaze me. Why talk about efficiency and fuel consumption when there is none. This is a show piece with no practical value. It's the wrong type of boat for speed or rough water. I always wonder on the multi engine setups if the power of the extra engines is needed to offset the drag of so many other lower units and the weight. This thing would need a 1000+ gallon fuel tank and likely gets far less than one mpg. It is probably rated in gallons per mile. This just looks like a luxury tug boat to me. Not that fast and not for open water but enough power to push a barge.
Aross
I don't understand why companies spend so much time and effort on these gas guzzling environment destroying monsters meant for the wealthy. Time and money would be better spent on developing hi efficiency electric options with a price that would be appealing to the masses.
Bruce H. Anderson
Here's a thought. Let's outlaw all forms of motorized (including electric) recreational boating. I see canoes and rowboats and sailboats and kayaks as the future. Maybe even motorized commercial shipping too. There would be lots of openings for galley slaves. That would address both the looming environmental catastrophe AND unemployment. Win-win!