Medical

H3 Health Cube set to enter use as a self-contained connected clinic

H3 Health Cube set to enter us...
The H3 Health Cube contains all its own diagnostic equipment, but is connected to the internet so patients can converse with their doctors in real time
The H3 Health Cube contains all its own diagnostic equipment, but is connected to the internet so patients can converse with their doctors in real time
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One of the H3 Health Cube prototypes
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One of the H3 Health Cube prototypes
The H3 Health Cube contains all its own diagnostic equipment, but is connected to the internet so patients can converse with their doctors in real time
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The H3 Health Cube contains all its own diagnostic equipment, but is connected to the internet so patients can converse with their doctors in real time

As the pandemic continues, most of us have gotten used to medical consultations being performed via the phone or Zoom. That said, there are still times when diagnostic devices need to be used … which is where the H3 Health Cube is designed to come in.

Manufactured by Vancouver, Canada-based company UniDoc Health, the internet-connected, wheelchair-accessible H3 is intended for use in venues like pharmacies, community centers, government institutions and care facilities. It can be set up indoors or outdoors, and could be particularly useful to people with limited transportation options even in non-pandemic times.

The idea is that instead of having to arrange an actual face-to-face visit with a doctor in their office, users will be able to engage in a remote real-time audio/video appointment with them via the Cube. Depending on what needs to be checked, the doctor will either guide them in the use of the diagnostic devices within the H3, or onsite trained personnel such as pharmacists or clinicians will provide assistance.

One of the H3 Health Cube prototypes
One of the H3 Health Cube prototypes

Along with the HD video communications system, each unit will incorporate a variety of tools that can be used to check vital signs (a stethoscope, blood pressure cuff, thermometer, etc), plus there will be the possibility of outfitting the H3 with equipment for performing procedures such as CT scans, colposcopies, abdominal ultrasounds and electrocardiograms, plus the drawing and analysis of blood samples.

The patient's privacy will be maintained throughout the appointment, and a UVC ultraviolet-light-based sterilization system – along with easy-clean surfaces – will facilitate sanitization between uses.

According to UniDoc, Cubes are already being tested in three pharmacies in the province of Ontario, with any another 30 planned to enter use in the city of Tucson, Arizona – a state-wide rollout should follow soon after.

Source: UniDoc Health

1 comment
1 comment
Michael son of Lester
Another step towards the "auto-docs" I've read about in so many science fiction novels. I guess the next thing will be computer AI that will replace doctors.