Automotive

Future Mercedes aesthetic emerges in concept form

Future Mercedes aesthetic emer...
The Mercedes Aesthetic A previews the next generation A-Class Compact
The Mercedes Aesthetic A previews the next generation A-Class Compact
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The Mercedes Aesthetic A previews the next generation A-Class Compact
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The Mercedes Aesthetic A previews the next generation A-Class Compact
Mercedes is focusing on smooth shapes and forms
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Mercedes is focusing on smooth shapes and forms
The shape of the Aesthetic A suggests a successor to the CLA is on the way
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The shape of the Aesthetic A suggests a successor to the CLA is on the way
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Mercedes design has undergone a huge transformation in the past 10 years, with a fresh focus on swooping lines and flashy chrome touches. Everything wearing a three-pointed star on its nose, from A-Class to S-Class, shares a familiar shape borne out of a clear design language. Based on the new Aesthetics A Concept, though, that language is set to change.

Anyone who's taken a look at a recent Mercedes concept will know creased, edgy designs aren't exactly in vogue at the moment. The 2015 F015 looks like a jellybean on wheels, and the Generation EQ is all about slick, rounded edges. Even the production range, with the exception of the utilitarian G-Class, has moved away from the bluff, upright looks that once defined the brand.

The Aesthetics A takes the current design language and smooths it out even further. Rather than adorning the basic shape with unnecessary slashes and creases (we're looking at you, Lexus), Mercedes has focused on using long, sweeping surfaces and contours to give the design character. You can expect to see this shade of red on plenty of cars in future, too, with Mercedes describing it as "a new signature."

Mercedes is focusing on smooth shapes and forms
Mercedes is focusing on smooth shapes and forms

For now, Aesthetics A previews the next generation A-Class, but you can expect cues from this dripping red blob of styling to pop up on the C-Class facelift when it arrives. Just don't expect any slashes or creases.

"Form and body are what remain when creases and lines are reduced to the extreme. We have the courage to implement this purism," says Gordon Wagener, Chief Design Officer at Daimler. "Design is also the art of omission: the days of creases are over."

Source: Daimler

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1 comment
TheMook
Cars are becoming less and less stylish, IMO. This is another example of that. The only way you can tell the difference between Lexus, Infiniti, Mercerdes, BMW, etc. is to look at the badging and head- and tail-light configuration. Not interested. Actually, boring is the first word that comes to mind for these "luxury" cars. I would much rather have less efficiency, and a more aesthetically pleasing design. 1955 Caddy Series 62, coupe or convertible, now that is a good-looking car...