Architecture

Tallest building in Europe planned for ... a small Alpine village?

Tallest building in Europe pla...
The tower would rise to a height of 381 m (1,250 ft), making it the same height as the Empire State Building and the tallest building in Europe (Image: Morphosis)
The tower would rise to a height of 381 m (1,250 ft), making it the same height as the Empire State Building and the tallest building in Europe (Image: Morphosis)
View 10 Images
The tower would rise to a height of 381 m (1,250 ft), making it the same height as the Empire State Building and the tallest building in Europe (Image: Morphosis)
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The tower would rise to a height of 381 m (1,250 ft), making it the same height as the Empire State Building and the tallest building in Europe (Image: Morphosis)
Architectural plan of the tower (Image: Morphosis)
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Architectural plan of the tower (Image: Morphosis)
The tower's form comprises three sections: a podium, a cantilevering section which includes a restaurant and bar, gallery, and a library that's also open to locals (Image: Morphosis)
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The tower's form comprises three sections: a podium, a cantilevering section which includes a restaurant and bar, gallery, and a library that's also open to locals (Image: Morphosis)
The tower also contains plus some suitably plush amenities like a ballroom, pool, fitness suite, and multiple spas (Image: Morphosis)
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The tower also contains plus some suitably plush amenities like a ballroom, pool, fitness suite, and multiple spas (Image: Morphosis)
The main body of the tower itself is slim and only contains one room per floor, with a huge mirrored facade that makes us worry for the local bird population (Image: Morphosis)
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The main body of the tower itself is slim and only contains one room per floor, with a huge mirrored facade that makes us worry for the local bird population (Image: Morphosis)
The tower features a total floorspace of 49,998 sq m (538,196 sq ft) split between 107 guest rooms (Image: Morphosis)
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The tower features a total floorspace of 49,998 sq m (538,196 sq ft) split between 107 guest rooms (Image: Morphosis)
Architectural plan of the tower (Image: Morphosis)
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Architectural plan of the tower (Image: Morphosis)
Architectural plan of the tower (Image: Morphosis)
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Architectural plan of the tower (Image: Morphosis)
Vals seems a baffling choice of location for the kind of building that's suited to a dense urban area without room for building horizontally (Image: Morphosis)
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Vals seems a baffling choice of location for the kind of building that's suited to a dense urban area without room for building horizontally (Image: Morphosis)
It should offer guests amazing views of the local landscape (Image: Morphosis)
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It should offer guests amazing views of the local landscape (Image: Morphosis)
View gallery - 10 images

Californian firm Morphosis (headed by Pritzker Architecture Prize winner Thom Mayne) has revealed plans for a slim mirrored skyscraper that – if it goes ahead – will be the tallest building in Europe. The part where things get weird is that it's due to be located in Vals: a small Swiss village with a population in the region of just 1,000.

Vals is an odd choice of location for the type of building that's best suited to a dense urban area without room for horizontal construction, but it must make monetary sense to the developers fronting up the cash to build it. That's beacause Vals isn't just a sleepy village but also the site of luxury resort 7132 (named after the postcode) that boasts a high-end hotel and spa complex built by fellow Pritzker winner Peter Zumthor.

The proposed skyscraper is part of an ongoing development of the area that also involves yet another Pritzker winner, Japanese architect Tadao Ando and his Valser Path project, a park due for completion in 2017.

The main body of the tower itself is slim and only contains one room per floor, with a huge mirrored facade that makes us worry for the local bird population (Image: Morphosis)
The main body of the tower itself is slim and only contains one room per floor, with a huge mirrored facade that makes us worry for the local bird population (Image: Morphosis)

The 7132 Tower will rise to a height of 381 m (1,250 ft), making it the tallest building in Europe – The Shard in London is currently tallest at 306 m (1,004 ft) – and the same height as the Empire State Building. This should offer guests the sort of amazing views that usually require one to climb a Swiss mountain.

The body of the skyscraper is slim and contains just one room per floor, with a mirrored facade that makes us worry for the local bird population. A total floorspace of 49,998 sq m (538,196 sq ft) is split between the 107 guest rooms and suites, in addition to some suitably plush amenities like a ballroom, pool, fitness suite, and multiple spas. Near ground level is a cantilevered section that shelters arriving guests from rain, and this includes a restaurant and bar, a gallery, and a library.

We've reached out to Morphosis for definite confirmation that the project is a done deal. It's slated for completion in 2019.

Source: Morphosis via Arch Daily

View gallery - 10 images
6 comments
Koolski
What a way to destroy the scenic view -- destroy it for everyone for a long way around!
David Earnest
Zilence Zerf! You vill obey ze Masters! You are right of course.
Derek Howe
The scenic view is still nice with this building, It's by no means an ugly building. Plus, just imagine living near the top, or even the middle, you are going to have an amazing view out of every window!
That would be an awesome building to live in.
MQ
hey if the mirrored façade is retro-reflective from a birds POV, while remaining specular ("normal" mirror) from the ground that would protect the birds while giving the pedestrians a view over the nearby mountain, it may make it easier to check out the snow condition, just look up.
Maybe a bridge from the top to a nearby mountain would allow the less-able to experience the actual mountains rather than man-made ones...OR a paragliding launch-pad will allow elevator-assisted launches into near-space from the rooftop, endless possibilities.
Jacob Shepley
destroy the view? you mean improve it. that thing is beautiful
The Skud
Hope they anchor the foundations very well in case of avalanches! Snowdrifts could be fun for ground floor views as well ...