Motorcycles

The 11th Motorcycle World Wheelie Championship shoots at 210+ mph on the back wheel

Gary Rothwell won the 10th World Wheelie Championship and one month later proceeded to smash the world record with a 210 mph run
Gary Rothwell won the 10th World Wheelie Championship and one month later proceeded to smash the world record with a 210 mph run
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Gary Rothwell won the 10th World Wheelie Championship and one month later proceeded to smash the world record with a 210 mph run
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Gary Rothwell won the 10th World Wheelie Championship and one month later proceeded to smash the world record with a 210 mph run
The World Wheelie Championship is open to regular motorcycle riders who would like to test their skills against the best
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The World Wheelie Championship is open to regular motorcycle riders who would like to test their skills against the best

An armada of supercharged sport bikes is gearing up for the eleventh edition of the World Wheelie Championship. This year's contestants have their sights firmly set on Gary Rothwell's world record from last September, when he exited the one-kilometer run at almost 210 mph on his back wheel.

Up to 30 top competitors from the US, UK, France, Holland and Ireland will be competing for the world title at the ex-RAF Elvington Airfield in North Yorkshire, England on August 20-21. Organized by Straightliners Limited, the event has grown to become a permanent fixture in the annual motorcycle racing calendar and attracts thousands of spectators every year.

The objective is to complete a full kilometer (0.62 mi) solely on the back wheel; the fastest exit speed marks the winner. Bidding for the world title requires motorcycles that can reach at least 200+ mph (320+ km/h), so most contestants race customized turbo-charged sport bikes, with Suzuki Hayabusa being the most popular among the top contenders.

Last year's Championship went to Gary Rothwell from England and his 540-hp (403 kW) turbo Hayabusa after his 197.879 mph (317.041 km/h) run. One month later Rothwell returned to the Straightliners' final Top Speed event of 2015 for a shot at the world record, which he smashed masterfully with an unbelievable 209.822 mph (337.676 km/h) exit speed. This sets the bar for the 2016 World Championship, as all the usual suspects return to the scene for the coveted world title and a new record attempt in the back of their minds.

Apart from the current world champion and record holder, Gary Rothwell, last year's podium finishers Egbert Van Popta from Holland and Paddy O'Sullivan from Ireland will also be there, along with Dave "Dodge" Rogers – the previous World Wheelie Champion who conceived and is the original driving force behind the World Championship.

The World Wheelie Championship is open to regular motorcycle riders who would like to test their skills against the best
The World Wheelie Championship is open to regular motorcycle riders who would like to test their skills against the best

The event is also open to any motorcycle rider who would like to test their skills and their motorcycle against the best in a safe and controlled environment.

"In the early days of wheelie world records it was dominated by an elite few with high powered turbo bikes. Working with Straightliners we wanted to also involve the average guy on his sport bike. The rules for the World Wheelie Championship have achieved this by attracting serious motorcycle riders from all walks of life," said Dave Rogers.

Straightliners is an affiliate of the Auto-Cycle Union (ACU) and the International Organisation of Professional Drivers (IOPD). Rider participation including record ratification and timing is administered by the UK Timing Association (UKTA). Both Straightliners and UKTA were set up by renowned motorcycle racer Trevor Duckworth.

The following video gives us a sniff at the high-speed action typically associated with the World Wheelie Chamnpionship.

Championship website: Straightliners

Wheelie action mixed videos

5 comments
Peter Kelly
Just why? If ever there was a truly ludicrous pastime (certainly not a sport) this is the number one contender, which only serves to inspire ever greater numbers of numbskulls to do the same in totally inappropriate places.
ronbh
The competitors of this event represent the best of men. Bold pushing the frontier of man and machine not because it is easy but because it is difficult. More men should be encouraged to pursue activities like this. In a world full of socialist propaganda trying to bring everyone down to the lowest common dominator we ne men that push the envelope without regard to personal safety. Free spirits that show us that it is possible to LIVE. And wheelies are just plain cool
VincentBrennan
What does it take to be a sport? Talent, skill and competitors? Sport! Who deems it inappropriate? YOU? I deem it appropriate! Ludicrous? Again why because YOU say so? I think rugby is ludicrous but it is not because I do not get to decide these things. Foot ball? If we go by life destroying injuries the NFL and all football leading up to it is crazy but who am I to tell them it is ludicrous? Inappropriate places? Again who decides that? What would be more appropriate than a runway? You know what I find ludicrous? I get so tired of people that decide what is wrong or right for everyone else calling THEM numbskulls although they are obviously VERY talented. No one is forcing them to do it or you to read about it. THAT would be ludicrous wouldn't it?
KeithPhillips
This event should not be allowed to take place. It is dangerous and should not be recorded as a world record because for one it is illegal to do wheelies, and it is also inciting other idiots to follow suite. Another reason for banning this event is that if someone falls of at 200mph it will result in instantaneous death. Need I say more?
sugamari
Winner = ronbh vs KeithPhillips (Dude! let's ban motorcycles. They are so dangerous. Er, I know let's ban freedom and new ideas too. Hell, while we're at it let's ban typing - that could be dangerous as well. All all this banning will create jobs for people like keithphillips.)
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