Architecture

MVRDV designs a tower with a twist

MVRDV designs a tower with a t...
The mixed-use tower will rise to a height of 110 m (360 ft) (Image: MVRDV)
The mixed-use tower will rise to a height of 110 m (360 ft) (Image: MVRDV)
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MVRDV has good form for producing visually-interesting architecture projects (Image: MVRDV)
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MVRDV has good form for producing visually-interesting architecture projects (Image: MVRDV)
The building is due to begin construction in 2016 (Image: MVRDV)
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The building is due to begin construction in 2016 (Image: MVRDV)
The tower will rise to a height of 110 m (360 ft) and contain 35,000 sq m (375,000 sq ft) of floor space (Image: MVRDV)
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The tower will rise to a height of 110 m (360 ft) and contain 35,000 sq m (375,000 sq ft) of floor space (Image: MVRDV)
The interior will also be home to some shops, restaurants, and cafes (Image: MVRDV)
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The interior will also be home to some shops, restaurants, and cafes (Image: MVRDV)
The firm says that the twist also helps to siphon off fierce autumn winds common in the area (Image: MVRDV)
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The firm says that the twist also helps to siphon off fierce autumn winds common in the area (Image: MVRDV)
The design for the plaza around the tower serves like an oversized sundial, on which the shadow of the building shows passing time (Image: MVRDV)
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The design for the plaza around the tower serves like an oversized sundial, on which the shadow of the building shows passing time (Image: MVRDV)
The as-yet unnamed mixed-use building will be located in vicinity of Vienna's historic Gasometers (Image: MVRDV)
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The as-yet unnamed mixed-use building will be located in vicinity of Vienna's historic Gasometers (Image: MVRDV)
The mixed-use tower will rise to a height of 110 m (360 ft) (Image: MVRDV)
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The mixed-use tower will rise to a height of 110 m (360 ft) (Image: MVRDV)
View gallery - 8 images

MVRDV has good form for producing visually-interesting architecture (take the Glass Farm and Rotterdam Markthal, for example). The Dutch firm is set to continue this trend with a new tower in Vienna that twists dramatically, to produce an almost hourglass-like shape.

The mixed-use building features a steel and glass facade and appears to be named Turm Mit Talle (which Google Translate tells us is Tower With Metals) – though this may prove a working title. It will be located in vicinity of Vienna's historic Gasometers, and rise to a total height of 110 m (360 ft).

The interior comprises 35,000 sq m (375,000 sq ft) of floor space, split between a mixture of high-end apartments and office spaces, in addition to a retail space, restaurants, and cafes. The interior of the lower 10 floors twists with the building's shape, while the 20 remaining floors of the tower are laid out in a square shape. Operable windows and French doors will encourage natural ventilation, and external stairs offer access to outdoor areas.

The building is due to begin construction in 2016 (Image: MVRDV)
The building is due to begin construction in 2016 (Image: MVRDV)

MVRDV reports that the tower's twisting shape serves a definite practical purpose. Building regulations required a trapezoidal tower rising to no more than 75 m (246 ft) in height, but the firm pushed for a taller and more compact building. Apparently, the twisting form will ensure that nearby buildings won't be left in an undue amount of shadow despite the increased height.

"In exchange for these concessions in the building’s volume and plan, the impact of the building’s shadow on its neighbors was minimized by MVRDV," says the firm. "The solution was to parametrically shape the lower 10 floors of the building into a twist, to minimize the structure’s shadow cast onto the neighboring facades to only two hours a day."

MVRDV further states that the twisting form of the tower helps to reduce the effects of severe winds common in the area, and that the design for the plaza around the tower serves like an oversized sundial, on which the shadow of the building will display the passing of time.

Construction is due to commence in 2016.

Source: MVRDV

View gallery - 8 images
4 comments
Neil Farbstein
They want a lethal disaster. Its inviting terrorist attacks if thew wind doesn't blow it down first. It makes the liberty tower project look good.
Bill Bennett
Wonder what it will look like after an earthquake.
Fairly Reasoner
The last thing Vienna needs is more Dutch "architecture". Can I say crap?
Wombat56
I don't know how practical it is but I like it.
I think image 6 would have been a better choice for the main image in the article, to see how the building really looks without the view point distortion.
http://www.gizmag.com/mvrdv-tower-twist/35722/pictures#6