Architecture

Orange Architects completes twisting stacked tower in Beirut

Construction on The Cube began in May 2011 and was completed in October 2015
Construction on The Cube began in May 2011 and was completed in October 2015
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Construction on The Cube began in May 2011 and was completed in October 2015
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Construction on The Cube began in May 2011 and was completed in October 2015
Dutch firm Orange Architects recently completed work on a distinctive residential tower in Beirut, Lebanon
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Dutch firm Orange Architects recently completed work on a distinctive residential tower in Beirut, Lebanon
Rising to a height of 50 m (164 ft), The Cube comprises 14 stacked volumes that are positioned to offer generous sheltered balconies to its inhabitants
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Rising to a height of 50 m (164 ft), The Cube comprises 14 stacked volumes that are positioned to offer generous sheltered balconies to its inhabitants
Based in Beirut's Sin el Fil district, The Cube consists of a fixed core at its center, which contains elevators and staircase
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Based in Beirut's Sin el Fil district, The Cube consists of a fixed core at its center, which contains elevators and staircase
Each floor sports an outdoor sheltered terrace made from its downstair's neighbor's roof
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Each floor sports an outdoor sheltered terrace made from its downstair's neighbor's roof
The apartments boast impressive views over the Mediterranean and the city's skyline
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The apartments boast impressive views over the Mediterranean and the city's skyline
The Cube's 14 volumes combine to a total floorspace of 5,600 sq m (60,277 sq ft)
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The Cube's 14 volumes combine to a total floorspace of 5,600 sq m (60,277 sq ft)
The Cube was commissioned by Lebanese development firm Masharii
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The Cube was commissioned by Lebanese development firm Masharii
Architectural drawing of The Cube
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Architectural drawing of The Cube
Architectural drawing of The Cube
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Architectural drawing of The Cube
Architectural drawing of The Cube
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Architectural drawing of The Cube
Architectural drawing of The Cube
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Architectural drawing of The Cube
Architectural drawing of The Cube
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Architectural drawing of The Cube
Architectural drawing of The Cube
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Architectural drawing of The Cube
Inside the 13th floor apartment
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Inside the 13th floor apartment

Dutch firm Orange Architects recently completed work on a distinctive residential tower in Beirut, Lebanon. Rising to a height of 50 m (164 ft), The Cube comprises 14 stacked volumes that rotate 90 degrees per level, offering generous sheltered balconies to its residents.

Based in a suburb east of the ancient city, The Cube is quite interesting structurally. It consists of a fixed core, which contains the elevators and staircases, crossed by concrete girders.

"Thanks to the fixed core with lifts and staircases at the heart of the building, there are no constraints on the layout of the apartments," explains the firm. "The floors run straight from the core to the facades, which are on each floor composed of two supporting concrete girders and two panoramic window frames, consequently rotated 90 degrees per level. Both the crossing girders and the core serve to stabilize the tower, an extra challenging task in a seismologically active area."

Inside the 13th floor apartment
Inside the 13th floor apartment

The Cube comprises a total floorspace of 5,600 sq m (60,277 sq ft), which is split between 19 luxury apartments. The homes range in size from 117 - 234 sq m (1,259 - 2,518 sq ft) and boast large terraces with views of the Mediterranean and the city's skyline, in addition to very generous glazing.

Parking is located in an underground garage, while a large section of the building hangs impressively over the main entrance.

The Cube was commissioned by Lebanese developers Masharii. Construction began in May 2011 and was completed in October 2015.

Source: Orange Architects via Arch Daily

1 comment
Alien
This is a very attractive design and looks like a smart bit of engineering too. Compared to many recent architectural items this seems outstandingly good. Well done Orange Architects -hope you can create more like this, perhaps even duplicates in other countries.
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