Mobile Technology

Panasonic's rugged Windows 10 Toughpad has a 4K display, higher than $4K (after conversion) price tag

Panasonic's rugged Windows 10 ...
Panasonic's latest Toughpad has some beefy internals and is the first to ship with Windows 10
Panasonic's latest Toughpad has some beefy internals and is the first to ship with Windows 10
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Panasonic's latest Toughpad has some beefy internals and is the first to ship with Windows 10
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Panasonic's latest Toughpad has some beefy internals and is the first to ship with Windows 10
The inclusion of the HDMI-in port on the new Toughpad allows for the device to be used as a monitor for other system when required
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The inclusion of the HDMI-in port on the new Toughpad allows for the device to be used as a monitor for other system when required
The device has a 15:10 aspect ratio, with a 3,840 x 2,560 resolution, giving it 230 pixels per inch over 20 inches
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The device has a 15:10 aspect ratio, with a 3,840 x 2,560 resolution, giving it 230 pixels per inch over 20 inches
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Panasonic's latest performance-focused Toughpad has the same 4K resolution we've seen in other models, but offers some serious horsepower under the hood, with an updated processor, better graphics and high-end storage options. At 20 inches, it's a huge tablet, and like previous models, is aimed squarely at professionals.

The device's 20-inch display has a 15:10 aspect ratio, with a 3,840 x 2,560 resolution, which comes out to a sharp (for a screen this size) 230 pixels per inch.

This FZ-Y1 Performance is the first model in the Toughpad lineup to ship with Windows 10 Pro, but it also has some impressive hardware under the hood. It's powered by an Intel Core i7-5600U processor, paired with a whopping 16 GB RAM, AMD FirePro M5100 dedicated graphics and a choice of 256 GB or 512 GB of solid state storage. That's a significant bump up from last year's equally performance-focused UT-MA6 Toughpad model, which ships with an older Core i7 chip, a much lower-end graphics solution and no higher capacity storage option.

The device has a 15:10 aspect ratio, with a 3,840 x 2,560 resolution, giving it 230 pixels per inch over 20 inches
The device has a 15:10 aspect ratio, with a 3,840 x 2,560 resolution, giving it 230 pixels per inch over 20 inches

The new system's connectivity isn't bad, with a gigabit LAN port, Mini DisplayPort out, HDMI-in (which lets it serve as a monitor for other devices), and one USB 3.0 port. There's also an optional Electronic Touch Pen active stylus available, which communicates with the tablet via Bluetooth, and offers 2,048 levels of pressure sensitivity.

The system is aimed specifically at CAD designers, architects and engineers, and comes certified to work with the 3D CAD application SOLIDWORKS. If you're not a fan of Microsoft's recent OS efforts, or your business isn't quite ready for Windows 10, there's also the option to downgrade to Windows 7 Professional.

Internally, the FZ-Y1 Performance looks to live up to its name, but Panasonic hasn't skimped on the durability either. A glass fiber case covers the device's magnesium frame, and the tablet is built to withstand falls from heights up to 76 cm (30 inches).

The Toughpad FZ-Y1 Performance will be available in December. As you might expect from a professional slate with these kind of specs, its pricing is far beyond consumer-level tablets, starting at £3,180 (around US$4,900) before taxes.

Source: Panasonic

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4 comments
4 comments
zr2s10
That price is absolutely insane. I don't see them selling many of these. Architects that frequently go on-site would be the majority of buyers, but even then, a Surface Pro or Surface book would be an acceptable option for noting any needed changes. Fully spec'd out, a Surface Book costs less, and is much more manageable to carry around than this monster.
Kris Lee
15:10 = 3:2 aspect ratio.
MQ
Obviously they are trading on the solidworks certification, to pitch this as a portable workstation replacement.
When complaining on price one needs to compare like-with-like.
Not truly portable as it is so-huge.
zr2s10
Obviously that is the pitch. But a Solidworks cert is only a small part of the consideration. When spec'ing out a workstation, you look at more than that. I've used Solidworks, but currently do my modeling with Inventor. The Surface Book is available with a similar or better build, and a Nvidia graphics card when connected to the keyboard. The keyboard/trackpad is another advantageas, nobody is going to truly do any real drafting with just a touchscreen. A 20" screen would be nice to look at vs a 13" screen, but not justifiable at this price point, IMO.