Wearables

Romain Jerome's Subcraft is a mechanical watch that looks digital

Romain Jerome's Subcraft is a ...
The more-expensive Speed Metal version of the Subcraft, on display at Baselworld (Photo: Chris Wood/Gizmag.com)
The more-expensive Speed Metal version of the Subcraft, on display at Baselworld (Photo: Chris Wood/Gizmag.com)
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The more-expensive Speed Metal version of the Subcraft, on display at Baselworld (Photo: Chris Wood/Gizmag.com)
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The more-expensive Speed Metal version of the Subcraft, on display at Baselworld (Photo: Chris Wood/Gizmag.com)
The less-costly (but still expensive) Titanium model (Photo: Chris Wood/Gizmag.com)
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The less-costly (but still expensive) Titanium model (Photo: Chris Wood/Gizmag.com)
Within its case is a mechanical movement created by Swiss watchmaking company Agenhor, which features a combination of lateral, linear, jumping and retrograde complications
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Within its case is a mechanical movement created by Swiss watchmaking company Agenhor, which features a combination of lateral, linear, jumping and retrograde complications
The Subcraft's cuff has a cut-out in the back, to display its pedigree
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The Subcraft's cuff has a cut-out in the back, to display its pedigree
The Subcraft Titanium (right) is priced at $24,500, while the PVD-coated Subcraft Speed Metal goes for $26,950
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The Subcraft Titanium (right) is priced at $24,500, while the PVD-coated Subcraft Speed Metal goes for $26,950
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When it comes to mechanical watches, we're used to seeing ones with the traditional face and hands. Romain Jerome's new Subcraft, however, does things a little differently. It displays the hour laterally in photoluminescent digital-style numerals along one edge, while the minute is viewed on a disc on top.

Spied by Gizmag at Baselworld 2015 in Switzerland, the Subcraft is the result of a collaboration between watch designers Manuel Emch and Alain Silberstein. Its form is said to "reflect the absence of ornamentation and bring out the harmony that is found between form and function." Additionally, it draws upon shapes found in nature, including the body of the manta ray.

The 54-jewel self-winding watch is being offered in two versions, one with a case made from natural-colored Grade 5 titanium, and another featuring a black PVD (physical vapor deposition)-coated titanium case. Within that housing is a mechanical movement created by Swiss watchmaking company Agenhor, which features a combination of lateral, linear, jumping and retrograde complications.

Within its case is a mechanical movement created by Swiss watchmaking company Agenhor, which features a combination of lateral, linear, jumping and retrograde complications
Within its case is a mechanical movement created by Swiss watchmaking company Agenhor, which features a combination of lateral, linear, jumping and retrograde complications

Its hour and minute displays are protected by anti-reflective sapphire crystal. Additionally, the watch is water-resistant to 30 meters (98 ft).

Only 99 units of each version are being sold. The Subcraft Titanium (made from bare Grade 5 titanium) is priced at US$24,500, while the PVD-coated Subcraft Speed Metal goes for $26,950.

Source: Romain Jerome

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2 comments
Gadgeteer
Sort of reminds me of the Sunwatch with LED digital display from way back in the late '70s.
https://books.google.com/books?id=QQEAAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA171&lpg=PA171#v=onepage&q&f=false
The Skud
Somebody must have been caught on a long weekend with a dead battery in their old fancy watch!