Bicycles

Senth IN1 glasses bring augmented reality to cycling

Senth IN1 glasses bring augmen...
Insenth's Senth IN1 glasses
Insenth's Senth IN1 glasses
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The Senth IN1 launch menu
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The Senth IN1 launch menu
Senth IN1 can display ride stats
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Senth IN1 can display ride stats
Senth IN1 can place and receive calls, and warn of oncoming vehicles
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Senth IN1 can place and receive calls, and warn of oncoming vehicles
Senth IN1 provides navigational cues
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Senth IN1 provides navigational cues
A rendering of the Senth IN1 glasses
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A rendering of the Senth IN1 glasses
Insenth's Senth IN1 glasses
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Insenth's Senth IN1 glasses
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Riding a bike while looking down at a smartphone isn’t the safest or smartest thing to do. While you could just pull over to use the phone, Chinese tech manufacturer Insenth is offering an alternative – augmented reality glasses designed specifically for cyclists. Called Senth IN1, they not only let riders place and receive phone calls, but they also let them select music, take photos, navigate, and more.

Senth IN1 communicates with the user’s iOS or Android phone via Bluetooth, while also communicating with a handlebar-mounted capacitive thumb remote. As with Google Glass, a small transparent video image is projected in the lower corner of the user’s field of view. Riders control functions either by using the remote, voice commands, head movements, or a lateral touchpad on one arm of the glasses.

Along with an HD camera (720p/30fps), mic and speaker, Senth IN1 also features onboard electronics such as a GPS unit, accelerometer, gyroscope, magnetometer, an ambient light sensor and a barometric altimeter. Power is provided by a USB-rechargeable lithium-polymer battery, that should be good for about five hours of intensive use.

The Senth IN1 launch menu
The Senth IN1 launch menu

As mentioned, the glasses relay calls from the paired phone, plus they let users search through their music library, shoot videos or stills (there’s 1GB of RAM), and receive on-screen navigational cues. Additionally, however, they can also display ride data (current speed, distance traveled, calories burned, etc), leave messages for other users that pop up at specific locations, plan/record routes, and receive warnings of oncoming vehicles. Using the ANT+ wireless protocol, it’s also possible to access data from third-party devices such as heart rate monitors or power meters.

And yes, both the glasses and the remote are "weatherproof," so a little rain shouldn’t hurt them. The glasses also have interchangeable lenses, for different riding conditions.

Insenth is currently raising production funds for the Senth IN1 glasses, on Indiegogo. A pledge of US$249 will get you a pair with a remote and four lenses, when and if they’re ready to go.

You can see the glasses in use, in the following video.

Sources: Insenth, Indiegogo

Senth IN1: The world's first Augmented Reality cycling glasses

View gallery - 6 images
10 comments
exodous
She has cool glasses but has no freaking idea how to wear a bike helmet.
I really thought Google should have focused on cyclists with their glasses, it seems like I can casually glance at a GPS unit/phone in my car without too much trouble bit on a bicycle I seem to be risking life and limb looking at one attached to my handle bars.
Wombat56
"they not only let riders place and receive phone calls, but they also let them select music, take photos, navigate, and more."

Making and receiving calls, selecting music, what could possibly go wron. . . OH MY GOD IT'S A CAR!!!
Matt Sedore
Interesting idea. Is it soo bulky that a rider cannot wear their helmet correctly (as shown in the picture)?? I would hate safety to be compromised for some cool new gadget
RonCallahan
Augmented reality or not, if you wear a helmet like the model at the top of the page and crash, your reality is going to be propped up in a wheelchair and drooling.
wener
Very great idea, I love the glasses with tracking data,taking photos. Sport glasses maybe is a possible direction for smart glasses.
ivan4
Ah, Google glass has found a home. Doing it this way will remove the negative stigma that was loaded onto Google glass by some luddites for no valid reason.
konet
It's really a good idea. I have ever imagined to ride with an AR glasses. Maybe the AR technology can also be used in running and even tennis. The price is really attractive!
Rann Xeroxx
What would really be nice is if there was a camera on the back of the bike or helmet and you can have a HUD of that to see behind you.
StWils
This is a stunningly bad idea. The last thing anyone piloting any kind of vehicle needs is a new cool way of diverting their attention. And, as already mentioned, wearing a bike helmet that way is incredibly unsafe and clearly shows the basic lack of competence the developers bring to this issue.
amazed W1
Any distraction from concentrating eyes and the connected parts of the brain on the road ahead makes using a vehicle less safe to everybody including the one who is distracted. Multi tasking on wheels and even on foot is questionable, even when some of the other tasks can be audio rather than video based. In the parts of London UK thro which I commute multi-tasking of any kind is near suicidal, as the reported accidents confirm. "Keep your mind on yr driving and your hands on the wheel and keep your kooky eyes on the road ahead, we're having fun, sitting in the backseat kissing and a-cuddling with Fred...." as the 1950s song goes, true now as it was then.