Motorcycles

Signal gives motorcycle visibility a boost

The Signal motorcycle helmet light (Photo: Quirky)
The Signal motorcycle helmet light (Photo: Quirky)
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Signal incorporates Lumigram, a fiber optic fabric that is flexible and lightweight, yet also able to emit bright pulses of light (Photo: Quirky)
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Signal incorporates Lumigram, a fiber optic fabric that is flexible and lightweight, yet also able to emit bright pulses of light (Photo: Quirky)
Signal is a helmet-mounted brake/turn indicator light, that syncs with the rider's motorcycle controls (Photo: Quirky)
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Signal is a helmet-mounted brake/turn indicator light, that syncs with the rider's motorcycle controls (Photo: Quirky)
Signal is powered by a built-in battery pack (Photo: Quirky)
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Signal is powered by a built-in battery pack (Photo: Quirky)
Signal can be attached to any full-face or open-face helmet (Photo: Quirky)
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Signal can be attached to any full-face or open-face helmet (Photo: Quirky)
The Signal motorcycle helmet light (Photo: Quirky)
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The Signal motorcycle helmet light (Photo: Quirky)

Because of the increased visibility that they offer, “third brake lights” have become standard on automobiles. Now, it's possible to buy kits that let you add such lights to the back of motorcycle helmets, although they typically have to be installed permanently. The Signal helmet light, however, can simply be strapped on.

Signal incorporates a fiber optic fabric known as Lumigram, that is flexible and lightweight, yet also able to emit bright pulses of light. It stretches over the rider’s existing full-face or open-face helmet, with the illuminated section centered on the back. A radio frequency transmitter on the motorcycle is synced with a receiver on the Signal, letting it know when the bike’s brakes or turn indicators are activated – Signal flares up, or blinks on one side or the other, accordingly.

Signal is currently posted on the Quirky product development website, where users determine the viability of products by indicating their interest in buying commercial versions of them. If enough people get on board with Signal, it may find its way into production.

Source: Quirky via 7 Gadgets

3 comments
Gadgeteer
Too narrow. It would be better to make something that rests on the shoulders, sort of like (American) football shoulder pads. Or even integrate it into a wide back protector. Then turn signals would get the benefit of being far apart and easy to discern. Also, shoulders are stationary, while a motorcyclist will often turn his head to see left and right. The back of the neck and shoulders wouldn't be much lower than the center of the head anyway.
Ct
Nice idea. Need a low power bluetooth transmitter mounted on the bike that would send a beeping type signal to all nearby cell phones and a flashing warning to car navigation units to alert drivers that a motorcycle is near by.
Guess What
@ctcsme: There is a system: http://www.freepatentsonline.com/7961086.pdf See Figures 20A and 20B Cheers!