Health & Wellbeing

Sprayable Sleep looks to spray away insomnia

Sprayable Sleep looks to spray...
Just a couple of sprays before bed allows the melatonin formula to soak into the skin
Just a couple of sprays before bed allows the melatonin formula to soak into the skin
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Application is recommended on each side of the neck or each wrist an hour before bed
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Application is recommended on each side of the neck or each wrist an hour before bed
Sprayable Sleep is an Indiegogo campaign that comes from the same company that launched Sprayable Energy
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Sprayable Sleep is an Indiegogo campaign that comes from the same company that launched Sprayable Energy
Sprayable Sleep claims to be more natural and productive than traditional melatonin sleep aids
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Sprayable Sleep claims to be more natural and productive than traditional melatonin sleep aids
Just a couple of sprays before bed allows the melatonin formula to soak into the skin
4/5
Just a couple of sprays before bed allows the melatonin formula to soak into the skin
Sprayable Sleep has a simple application process that certainly feels more natural than a sleeping pill
5/5
Sprayable Sleep has a simple application process that certainly feels more natural than a sleeping pill
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A little more than a year ago, Gizmag featured an Indiegogo campaign that was marketing Sprayable Energy, which delivered a caffeine hit through the skin. Now the same company, Sprayable, has launched another campaign for a spray claimed to do the opposite – it puts you to sleep. Gizmag got a sample of Sprayable Sleep to put these claims to the test.

Sprayable Sleep utilizes melatonin, which is a chemical that humans produce naturally to control our night-day cycle. According to the company, current oral melatonin pills, which are a common administration for aiding sleep, often contain 10 to 100 times more of the chemical than is necessary. Sprayable uses a fraction of the sleep-inducing juice, which the company claims will enter the body "gently and smoothly" over time as it gradually permeates the skin. While overdosing on melatonin is incredibly unlikely, even in oral use, the company still has a disclaimer saying, "do not exceed 8 sprays in 24 hours."

"It definitely does run the risk of being a little too effective for some people," says Ben Yu, one of the co-founders of Sprayable. "Since it absorbs steadily through the skin, some people have reported that despite sleeping really well, they end up needing more sleep than they planned for, and consequently when they force themselves awake before their bodies are ready to wake up with an alarm clock, they do still feel a little groggy.”

The difference, as the company sees it, is that Sprayable Sleep emulates the body’s natural melatonin production, bypassing the digestive system and making the application more natural than taking the chemical in pill form.

Application is recommended on each side of the neck or each wrist an hour before bed
Application is recommended on each side of the neck or each wrist an hour before bed

The initial application was a bit off-putting for me, as I'm not generally accustomed to sprays or colognes, but after the initial wince of uncertainty, the application process was smooth. I was pleasantly surprised that there was no stickiness to the formula, and the company claims it is odorless as well. While this was mostly true, there was a light, new-car-esque smell, though this may have been from manufacturing rather than the formula itself.

Application is recommended either on each side of the neck or each wrist an hour before bed. My wife and I trialled it over a few nights and, while I only experienced mildly-heavy eyes after administration, my wife was out within twenty minutes. There was little odor and the mist was easy to apply. This method of application certainly feels more natural than pills, but as can be expected, results will vary.

One bottle costs US$15, and contains enough of the insomnia killer to last one month. Sprayable Sleep already has over US$125,000 raised on the Indiegogo campaign, with 31 days still to go. If it keeps this pace, Sprayable Sleep will leave its predecessor in its wake.

The campaign pitch video can be seen below.

Source: Sprayable

Welcome to Sprayable Sleep

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12 comments
Kevin Ritchey
Placebo effect possibly? I just don't see any amount of melatonin being absorbed through the skin as being therapeutically possible. Unless attached molecularly via a carrier such as DMSO or some other method, I'm a little leery of just a couple milligrams sprayed dermally as being enough to reach the brain stem area, much less making the trip easily since the skin also acts as a filter mechanism as well as a fluid transferal processor. And I'm just a layman saying this. I'd have to see some real facts before believing in homeopathic mumbo-jumbo. I've swam in the ocean yet didn't come out brined!
Joel Detrow
Very impressive!
Jay Finke
I need a gallon PLEASE ! I hope it works, that would be soooo Cool.
hardboiled
If this works , I want it!
David Storfer
Many drugs are administered transdermally via skin patches. Several pain meds only dose in the micrograms per hour yet are as strong as taking a handful of hydrocodone pills several times throughout the day. Also the birth control patch which is a set of hormones, and the smoking cessation patch of nicotine.
Gadgeteer
I'd like to know where they got their 0.03 mg dosage recommendation. The MIT study cited by other sources says the recommended dose is 0.3mg. They also seem to give contradictory information. They claim the liver inactivates 90% of oral melatonin. So then tablets with 10x the recommended dose would seem to be the obvious solution, since 1/10 times 10 = 1.
This is ridiculously expensive at $15 for 30 doses. You can buy 100 timed release 300 mcg (0.3mg) tablets for the same price.
William H Lanteigne
Pills are far cheaper to manufacture than aerosol sprays. You pay for the convenience.
Ranscapture
Melatonin is addictive and causes your body to stop producing as much should you stop using it so after you don't use it you will need a many days to start producing normally again. Also your tolerance builds up so you will need more and more.
From experience.
Michael Z. Williamson
Melatonin is a natural hormone so is not addictive, anymore than L-tyrosine or testosterone.
If you are low on melatonin, you will have trouble falling asleep.
If melatonin is not helping you get to sleep, then the problem is something else.
Walt Stawicki
Adictive is a different issue. Given a supply that the body says is enough, the body mechanisms will throttle back your own production od melatonin, and there will be a "habituation" to the external supply, and a period of reseting natural production after cesation of the spray. the 90% destroyed in the stomach means 10%, which is what is in the spray, is the proper dose. (10% of the stomach dose)
note they had to go to a non mfg to get this up? they had to go to the gulible funding sources...