Juno

  • ​Since entering orbit around Jupiter last July, NASA's Juno probe has circled the gas giant every 53 days. This week, scientists are publishing the results of the orbiter's first data collection pass, with an unexpectedly strong magnetic field one of the Jovian features to catch them by surprise.
  • It's official: Jupiter is big enough to be home to not just one, but two great spots. University of Leicester astronomers report that they have discovered what they call the "Great Cold Spot" that is almost as big as the gas giant's famed "Great Red Spot."
  • While the Juno probe has had lots of successes, the mission has also had a few hiccups. Because of issues discovered in October with two helium check valves, NASA has announced that it'll be abandoning the maneuver to put the probe into a closer orbit with Jupiter, deeming it too risky.
  • Scientists from the US and France have built a miniature "tabletop" Jupiter that provides an analog simulation of the Jovian atmosphere's deep structure and internal dynamics.
  • It has been largely smooth sailing for NASA's Juno probe since it entered orbit around Jupiter a few months ago, but some minor hiccups are keeping mission operators on their toes.
  • Through a meticulously planned orbit, NASA's Juno probe has now circled Jupiter and evaded its harmful radiation for more than four months, but just as the spacecraft was to swing in for a closer look, an unexpected engine complication has resulted in a first, and hopefully minor, setback.​​
  • NASA has provided the first close-up and personal view of Jupiter's north pole with the release of images from the Juno orbiter's close encounter with the gas giant. Data returned by the unmanned spacecraft has already thrown up a few surprises.
  • NASA's Juno orbiter has made its first and nearest orbital flyby of Jupiter, snapping the closest close-up ever​ of giant planet's north pole. NASA expects to release some of the images it captured over the next two weeks.​
  • ​​NASA's Juno spacecraft is set for a close encounter with one of the most visually striking, and enigmatic bodies in our solar system – the planet Jupiter.
  • Now that Juno has entered into orbit around Jupiter, what better time to take a closer look at what, precisely, Juno will be able to tell us about the largest planet in our solar system?
  • Like any good tourist, NASA's Juno deep-space probe is sending snapshots to the folks back home. It's the first image from Jupiter since the spacecraft's dramatic arrival around the planet on July 4 and shows Jupiter and three of its four largest moons.
  • ​Jupiter got a little less lonely today as NASA's Juno deep-space probe arrived after a five-year journey capped by a dramatic engine maneuver that placed it in orbit around the Solar System's largest planet for a 20-month science mission.​