Pacemaker

  • ​Typically, if an infant is receiving a pacemaker, open-chest surgery is required. Should a new prototype miniature pacemaker reach commercialization, however, all that will be required is a single small incision – that means shorter surgeries, less pain and faster recoveries.
  • ​Using principles similar to those deployed in large hydroelectric power plants, a team of Chinese researchers has developed a tiny nanogenerator that can potentially sit inside a vein and generate electricity from blood rushing through it.
  • Researchers have redesigned the pacemaker, developing a new prototype that is wireless, battery-free and can be implanted directly into a patient's heart. The design offers an innovative new type of pacemaker that promises less complications than current devices.
  • A team of researchers has designed an exciting new energy storage system they call 'a biological supercapacitor' which could offer wearers battery-free implantable devices that never need to be replaced.
  • A flat battery is a major hassle in implanted electronic medical devices, such as pacemakers. It often means invasive surgery to replace the battery, but a new study has found​ that the use of solar cells implanted under the skin to power medical implants is a feasible approach.
  • For people can't tolerate one of the more popular ways to treat sleep apnea, a new chest implant that sends electrical pulses to a nerve in the tongue promises healthier rest, as reported in a new University of Pennsylvania (U Penn) study.
  • Two years ago we heard about the Nanostim, a pacemaker that's less than 10 percent the size of a regular model. While it's pretty darn small, Medtronic's just-announced Micra TPS (Transcatheter Pacing System) is reportedly even tinier.
  • In the near future, it's entirely possible that babies with heart defects will be born with complete pacemakers already installed. That's because scientists have developed the world's first fully-implantable pacemaker for fetuses.
  • Although cardiac pacemakers have saved countless lives, they do have at least one shortcoming – like other electronic devices, their batteries wear out. Swiss scientists, however, have developed a wristwatch-inspired device that can power a pacemaker via the beating of the patient’s own heart.
  • Mechanical pacemakers serve an invaluable purpose, by electrically stimulating a recipient's heart. Now, for the first time, scientists have injected genes into the defective hearts of pigs, converting unspecialized heart cells into "biological pacemakers."
  • A group of researchers has developed a cardiac pacemaker that is powered semi-permanently by a flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator. Designed to be implanted directly in the body, it is claimed to generate enough electricity to directly stimulate the heart from small movements of body muscles.
  • Researchers at Stanford University have developed a new way to safely transfer energy to tiny medical devices implanted deep inside the human body, leading to the development of tiny "electroceutical" devices that could treat diseases using electronics rather than drugs.