Automotive

Tesla starts offering cheaper mid-range Model 3

Tesla starts offering cheaper ...
Until now, Tesla has only offered more expensive, higher performance versions of its Model 3 sedan
Until now, Tesla has only offered more expensive, higher performance versions of its Model 3 sedan
View 4 Images
Billed as its first electric sedan for the masses, Tesla’s Model 3 has attracted huge interest since it was announced in April 2016
1/4
Billed as its first electric sedan for the masses, Tesla’s Model 3 has attracted huge interest since it was announced in April 2016
Revamped Model 3 order page
2/4
Revamped Model 3 order page
The mid-range Tesla Model 3 carries a sticker price of $45,000
3/4
The mid-range Tesla Model 3 carries a sticker price of $45,000
Until now, Tesla has only offered more expensive, higher performance versions of its Model 3 sedan
4/4
Until now, Tesla has only offered more expensive, higher performance versions of its Model 3 sedan

Billed as its first electric sedan for the masses, Tesla's Model 3 has attracted huge interest since it was announced in April 2016, resulting in hundreds of thousands of pre-orders. The company is now, for the first time, taking orders for shorter range, rear-wheel drive versions starting at US$45,000.

Because the Tesla Model 3 is built for the mass-market, the company has promised a $35,000 base model from the outset. Up until now it has only offered more expensive, higher performance versions, and while today's announcement doesn't quite hit the mark, current tax incentives in the US bring it down to that level.

The mid-range Model 3 is powered by the same battery pack that features in the 310-mile (499 km) range model, but with fewer cells. The newly available 260-mile model has a top speed of 125 mph (201 km/h) and accelerates from 0 to 60 mph (96 km/h) in 5.6 seconds.

The mid-range Model 3 carries a sticker price of $45,000, but the company prominently features the total cost with tax incentives and gas savings taken into account, which it calculates to be $33,200.

Revamped Model 3 order page
Revamped Model 3 order page

But as noted by Business Insider, these tax incentives won't be around forever, with Tesla racking up 200,000 sales and therefore soon to forego its ability to offer $7,500 tax credits to its customers.

The new order page also states a 6-10 week delivery period, which if you've been following Tesla' progress in manufacturing, may seem rather optimistic. The company has struggled to hit its production targets for the Model 3 thus far, though its most recent quarterly report suggest things are looking upward.

Source: Tesla, Elon Musk (Twitter)

Billed as its first electric sedan for the masses, Tesla's Model 3 has attracted huge interest since it was announced in April 2016, resulting in hundreds of thousands of pre-orders. The company is now, for the first time, taking orders for shorter range, rear-wheel drive versions starting at US$45,000.

Because the Tesla Model 3 is built for the mass-market, the company has promised a $35,000 base model from the outset. Up until now it has only offered more expensive, higher performance versions, and while today's announcement doesn't quite hit the mark, current tax incentives in the US bring it down to that level.

The mid-range Model 3 is powered by the same battery pack that features in the 310-mile (499 km) range model, but with fewer cells. The newly available 260-mile model has a top speed of 125 mph (201 km/h) and accelerates from 0 to 60 mph (96 km/h) in 5.6 seconds.

The mid-range Model 3 carries a sticker price of $45,000, but the company prominently features the total cost with tax incentives and gas savings taken into account, which it calculates to be $33,200.

Revamped Model 3 order page
Revamped Model 3 order page

But as noted by Business Insider, these tax incentives won't be around forever, with Tesla racking up 200,000 sales and therefore soon to forego its ability to offer $7,500 tax credits to its customers.

The new order page also states a 6-10 week delivery period, which if you've been following Tesla' progress in manufacturing, may seem rather optimistic. The company has struggled to hit its production targets for the Model 3 thus far, though its most recent quarterly report suggest things are looking upward.

Source: Tesla, Elon Musk (Twitter)

9 comments
guzmanchinky
I would LOVE a Tesla! But I don't have anywhere to plug it in at night. Unless you have a garage that you own (not a rental) it's hard to justify buying one. Bring on the 5 minute charging batteries from a plug at Shell.
Joshua Tulberg
@guzmanchinky: If you have a garage, or driveway then it doesn't matter that it's a rental because you can charge off of 110V. It just takes a while, but most people have their car parked a while too.
Username
"the same battery pack that features in the 310-mile (499 km) range model, but with fewer cells" ...So, not the same battery back. The same battery pack technology.
MD
Username: Same battery case.. Upradable to future tech (as long as the cell format remains constant..)
guzmanchinky
Joshua they told me 20 hours for a charge on 110v. No thanks. Like I said, I'll wait for the quick charging batteries. They are coming very very soon...
ljaques
I wonder if they use the same battery carrier, just with fewer cell modules, for the different battery size offerings. The "battery pack" (spam can) encompasses the entire floor between the axles on most Teslas, so that would be logical. I'd love a Tesla, too, but I'm about $33.2k-45k short.
MartinVoelker
That's an exiting price point, considering that according to Kelley Blue Book the estimated average transaction price in the US was $36,113 in December 2017. If you can get that financed you're looking at a five year cost of ownership that is right around a top of the line Toyota Camry – with the important distinction that it's nothing like a Camry, and doesn't spew toxic fumes.
Bruce H. Anderson
The real test is how well the Model 3 will sell without government incentives.
Rustin Lee Haase
Tesla Motors still has a way to go to get their production costs down far enough that they can sell an actually affordable car. They are not there yet. $35k models are still unobtanium with not solid date of when they will come. That said, even at $35k, most people still can't afford them and so the product still fails to "save the planet" as the tree huggers would hope. Until then I'll just keep driving my 100 mile range $9.6k 2015 Nissan LEAF. (much more practical for my needs) At least my way I'm not only going green I'm saving some green too. There's a strong stench of elitism in Tesla Motors so I don't expect them to make products for the average Joe any time soon. They are clueless about people who have chosen to live a family life with practical needs rather than just chasing after the latest hot new toy and any cost. Still, with the right moment of revelation, even that could change.