Architecture

Stunning curved roof tops rural Chinese dwelling

Stunning curved roof tops rura...
Monoarchi created the Treewow Villa O with help from local craftsmen in a rural village in Yuyao, Zhejiang Province, China
Monoarchi created the Treewow Villa O with help from local craftsmen in a rural village in Yuyao, Zhejiang Province, China
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The Treewow Villa O was completed in April
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The Treewow Villa O was completed in April
The Treewow Villa O is a vacation villa located next to a hotel in a rural mountain village in Yuyao, Zhejiang Province, China
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The Treewow Villa O is a vacation villa located next to a hotel in a rural mountain village in Yuyao, Zhejiang Province, China
The Treewow Villa O reaches a total height of 8 m (26 ft), which is around the same height as a nearby bamboo grove, according to architects Monoarchi
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The Treewow Villa O reaches a total height of 8 m (26 ft), which is around the same height as a nearby bamboo grove, according to architects Monoarchi
Monoarchi created the Treewow Villa O with help from local craftsmen in a rural village in Yuyao, Zhejiang Province, China
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Monoarchi created the Treewow Villa O with help from local craftsmen in a rural village in Yuyao, Zhejiang Province, China
The Treewow Villa O's design reminds us of a hermit crab, or perhaps a helmet
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The Treewow Villa O's design reminds us of a hermit crab, or perhaps a helmet
The Treewow Villa O's overhanging eaves provide a sheltered space on the villa's terrace
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The Treewow Villa O's overhanging eaves provide a sheltered space on the villa's terrace
"The crude hand construction of traditional dwellings is different from fine production under standardization and industrialization," says Monoarchi, who used local craftsmen in the construction of Treewow Villa O
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"The crude hand construction of traditional dwellings is different from fine production under standardization and industrialization," says Monoarchi, who used local craftsmen in the construction of Treewow Villa O
The interior includes a living room and bedroom 
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The interior includes a living room and bedroom 
A spiral staircase leads to the Treewow Villa O's rooftop terrace area
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A spiral staircase leads to the Treewow Villa O's rooftop terrace area
View of the Treewow Villa O's rooftop terrace
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View of the Treewow Villa O's rooftop terrace
The Treewow Villa O was completed in April
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The Treewow Villa O was completed in April
The Treewow Villa O is raised on steel structural supports
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The Treewow Villa O is raised on steel structural supports
View of the Treewow Villa O's rooftop terrace
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View of the Treewow Villa O's rooftop terrace
A render showing the interior of Treewow Villa O
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A render showing the interior of Treewow Villa O

Call us old-fashioned, but we think that for a dwelling to be considered a real tree house, it must actually be connected to a tree. Still, what it lacks in trees, the Treewow O - A Tree House of Curved Round Roof more than makes up for with a stunning undulating roof.

The Treewow O - A Tree House of Curved Round Roof (or Treewow Villa O for short) is a vacation home located in a rural village in Yuyao, Zhejiang Province, China. It's raised off-the-ground and reaches a total height of 8 m (26 ft), which is around the same height as a nearby bamboo grove, according to architects Monoarchi.

To support the elaborate curved roof, which is based on three non-concentric circles and sports eye-catching hanging eaves, Monoarchi used 57 wooden trusses that vary in thickness. The roof is made from red cedar wood and the lower part of the dwelling features steel structural supports.

Inside, the first floor of the Treewow Villa O is also finished in red cedar and consists of a living room, plus a bedroom, and a bathroom with a bathtub. In addition, a spiral staircase leads up to a rooftop terrace area that provides views of the landscape, including a nearby 200 year old tree.

The Treewow Villa O was completed in April
The Treewow Villa O was completed in April

Monoarchi hired local craftsmen to handle the construction of Treewow Villa O, though chose not to use local bamboo as a construction material in order to make the build process easier, instead relying on wood that was shipped in.

"The crude hand construction of traditional dwellings is different from fine production under standardization and industrialization," explains the firm. "The non-linear eave has extremely high error-tolerant rate, which can be considered as a respect of rural construction to natural laws. During the design and construction process, the architect remained close communications with local craftsmen to achieve a balance between the design form and local construction skills."

The Treewow Villa O was completed in April.

Source: Monoarchi

1 comment
Riaanh
Stunning house, a pity though that most people wont ever see it from the top.