Drones

Drones face mandatory registration in the US

Drones face mandatory registra...
New regulations will require drones in the United States to be registered with the government
New regulations will require drones in the United States to be registered with the government
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New regulations will require drones in the United States to be registered with the government
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New regulations will require drones in the United States to be registered with the government

The US Department of Transportation (USDoT) Secretary Anthony Foxx announced today that drones in the United States will soon require federal registration. As part of this effort, Secretary Foxx and FAA Administrator Michael Huerta are putting together a task force made up representatives from the government, along with the UAS and manned aviation industries to provide recommendations on how to best implement a registration process.

According to the USDoT, drones pose potential hazards to manned aircraft, with sightings by pilots doubling from 2014 to 2015. These have also included incidents near major sporting events and interference with emergency responders such as firefighting crews. As the FAA is still working on a new legal framework for the operation of drones, the registration requirement is an effort to introduce a level of accountability to those flying their aircraft irresponsibly.

Due to report on November 20, the task force is made up of 25 to 30 representatives from the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International, Academy of Model Aircraft, Air Line Pilots Association, and others. Its purpose is to draw up an advisory list as to which unmanned aircraft should be exempt from regulation (such as toys and small drones), how the registration process can be streamlined, and safety recommendations where appropriate.

The FAA says that in the meantime it will continue its safety education initiatives, such as the Know Before You Fly and No Drone Zone campaigns, and rigid enforcement of current flight restrictions.

"Registration will help make sure that operators know the rules and remain accountable to the public for flying their unmanned aircraft responsibly," says Huerta. "When they don’t fly safely, they’ll know there will be consequences."

Source: USDoT

7 comments
AntonNewcombe
This is absolutly farcical. Surely the Government should utilise heavier policing of drone use, via advertising campaigns and the issuing of infringement notices for misuse. A registration scheme for such a low cost item makes no sense. Imagine the reaction when a 14 year old doesn't register his drone with the FAA and gets fined. Some of these things are less than 50 bucks at walmart http://thedronebuyersguide.com/2015/09/13/top-drones-for-2015/
Anne Ominous
Not to mention that being Federal agencies, Constitutionally, neither FAA or DOT have any legal authority over airspace that is not involved in interstate commerce.

They have no more authority over all the air than EPA has over all the water. Which is to say: none. Their authority extends to "interstate navigable" routes only.
piperTom
I see a big future for DIY drone kits, 3D printed plans, and numerous other end-runs. I also foresee Millions of teens wanting to do this. Good luck with your enforcement FAA!
ErstO
@piperTom
What? No legal authority over airspace that is not involved in interstate commerce?
I am sure there are a lot of private pilots that have nothing to do with interstate commerce that would love to believe that.
And although I might agree that the FAA’s jurisdiction on drones may be shaky, there is precedent as the FAA has been regulating some aspects of remote control aircraft since the “FAA Modernization and Reform Act” became law in 2012.
Thats not to say I agree with the FAA on this, public education for the NewBees are better then total regulations, I have quads, I have RC aircraft, I use FPV in some that the FAA frowns on, but I don't fly over populated areas, I don't fly near restricted airspace, and I play by the rules.
Its the NewBees that are screwing this up.
AliciaRussell
What could possibly go wrong? I'm sure that this will be as effective and enforceable as gun control has been.
Nik
More fodder for the corporate prison businesses?
Lbrewer42
Build it, and they (government) will come... thinking they have the right to regulate it.
Hey, I can predict the future - I predict the registration fees will be insane so less companies will want to register them.