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World’s largest underground trampoline set to open in North Wales

World’s largest underground tr...
The old Blaenau Ffestiniog slate mine in Northern Wales is soon to become the home of the world's largest underground trampoline
The old Blaenau Ffestiniog slate mine in Northern Wales is soon to become the home of the world's largest underground trampoline
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Bounce Below is the only underground trampoline in the world
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Bounce Below is the only underground trampoline in the world
Battle Below is located deep within a 100 ft (30.5 m) deep and 60 ft (18.3 m) wide disused mine
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Battle Below is located deep within a 100 ft (30.5 m) deep and 60 ft (18.3 m) wide disused mine
The three trampolines are linked together by 60 ft (18.3 m) slides and a spiraling staircase
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The three trampolines are linked together by 60 ft (18.3 m) slides and a spiraling staircase
Adding to the atmosphere, multi-colored LED lights have been installed throughout the mine, which project onto the walls of the cavern
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Adding to the atmosphere, multi-colored LED lights have been installed throughout the mine, which project onto the walls of the cavern
The old Blaenau Ffestiniog slate mine in Northern Wales is soon to become the home of the world's largest underground trampoline
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The old Blaenau Ffestiniog slate mine in Northern Wales is soon to become the home of the world's largest underground trampoline
Underground caverns are twice the size of St Paul’s Cathedral in London
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Underground caverns are twice the size of St Paul’s Cathedral in London
Zip World theme park currently boasts the world’s longest and fast zip wire and the world’s biggest zip zone
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Zip World theme park currently boasts the world’s longest and fast zip wire and the world’s biggest zip zone
Zip World Titan, situated near the historic slate mining town of Blaenau Ffestiniog
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Zip World Titan, situated near the historic slate mining town of Blaenau Ffestiniog
Zip line riders fly high over Moor, Mountain and Mine
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Zip line riders fly high over Moor, Mountain and Mine
There are over 8 km of cable at Zip World and participants descend each zip line in teams of four
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There are over 8 km of cable at Zip World and participants descend each zip line in teams of four

The old Blaenau Ffestiniog slate mine in Northern Wales is soon to become the home of the world's largest underground trampoline. Set to open on Friday, Bounce Below is the newest attraction to the Zip World theme park, which currently boasts the world’s longest and fastest zip wire and the world’s biggest zip zone.

Zip World's commercial director, Sean Taylor came up with the idea of an underground trampoline after seeing a similar netted structure in a French forest. Inspired by the idea to create a year round adventure experience, Taylor hopes the new underground park will attract more visitors to the area.

"The surreal experience of Bounce Below cannot be matched as there’s nothing like it anywhere else on earth," says Sean Taylor. "It’s essentially a ginormous underground playground and an amazing way to experience a subterranean world in a way never before possible. The best thing is you can do it all year round."

Bounce Below is located deep within a 100 ft (30.5 m) deep and 60 ft (18.3 m) wide disused mine. The new site features three large trampolines stretching across the cave-like mine walls and are positioned at varying heights. The trampolines are linked together by 60 ft (18.3 m) slides and a spiraling staircase. Adding to the atmosphere, multi-colored LED lights have been installed throughout the mine, which project onto the walls of the cavern.

Adding to the atmosphere, multi-colored LED lights have been installed throughout the mine, which project onto the walls of the cavern
Adding to the atmosphere, multi-colored LED lights have been installed throughout the mine, which project onto the walls of the cavern

It took over a kilometer of nett and 4,500 man hours to complete the underground trampolines, which can accommodate 100 bouncing visitors at a time. Patrons are required to wear protective gear, including overalls and a helmet before gaining access to the site via an old mining train. They're also encouraged to bounce as high as they dare, potentially reaching a maximum height of 80 ft (24 m).

Bounce Below opens on July 4, with tickets starting from £15 (about US$25) per person.

Source: Zip World via Designboom

3 comments
zevulon
bouncing around in a mine. what could possibly go wrong.
Clay Jones
Just another reason to go to Wales!
JAT
Bounce up to 80ft? Somebody's going to get killed fer sure!