Architecture

The carbon-positive home that costs $2.35 a year to power

10Star Home was built with a zero-waste philosophy and was designed topositively exceed its carbon footprint over its lifespan 
10Star Home was built with a zero-waste philosophy and was designed topositively exceed its carbon footprint over its lifespan 
View 20 Images
Inside the 10 Star Home by The Sociable Weaver and Clare Cousin Architects
1/20
Inside the 10 Star Home by The Sociable Weaver and Clare Cousin Architects
The home features a FSC hardwood clad exterior and polished industrial concrete floors with under slab insulation
2/20
The home features a FSC hardwood clad exterior and polished industrial concrete floors with under slab insulation
The 10 Star Home was designed and created as an example of how a sustainable home can still be modern, functional and beautiful
3/20
The 10 Star Home was designed and created as an example of how a sustainable home can still be modern, functional and beautiful
The “zero-waste” goal involved asking suppliers to reduce packaging for materials delivered on site, while the rest was recycled or re-purposed
4/20
The “zero-waste” goal involved asking suppliers to reduce packaging for materials delivered on site, while the rest was recycled or re-purposed
The 10 Star Home was designed and created as an example of how a sustainable home can still be modern, functional and beautiful
5/20
The 10 Star Home was designed and created as an example of how a sustainable home can still be modern, functional and beautiful
The 160-sqm home was built using traditional construction techniques and producing as little waste as possible, with only three bags of trash ending upin landfill
6/20
The 160-sqm home was built using traditional construction techniques and producing as little waste as possible, with only three bags of trash ending upin landfill
The interior of the home features a large contemporary kitchen which overlooks the open plan living and dining areas
7/20
The interior of the home features a large contemporary kitchen which overlooks the open plan living and dining areas
The home is complete with a sleek bathroom, featuring sustainably-sourced timber and bamboo toothbrushes
8/20
The home is complete with a sleek bathroom, featuring sustainably-sourced timber and bamboo toothbrushes
The architects chose to furnish the home with local and sustainable Australian products, including  organic cotton mattresses and bedding
9/20
The architects chose to furnish the home with local and sustainable Australian products, including  organic cotton mattresses and bedding
All timber furniture was made from reclaimed or sustainably-sourced wood
10/20
All timber furniture was made from reclaimed or sustainably-sourced wood
The home features a passive solar design with cross-flow ventilation to heat and cool the home
11/20
The home features a passive solar design with cross-flow ventilation to heat and cool the home
The  home is complete with a sleek bathroom and simple open bedroom designs
12/20
The  home is complete with a sleek bathroom and simple open bedroom designs
Large floor-to-ceiling glass windows take advantage of the beautiful coastal location and soft neutral colors help the home blend into it's natural landscape
13/20
Large floor-to-ceiling glass windows take advantage of the beautiful coastal location and soft neutral colors help the home blend into it's natural landscape
10Star Home was built with a zero-waste philosophy and was designed topositively exceed its carbon footprint over its lifespan 
14/20
10Star Home was built with a zero-waste philosophy and was designed topositively exceed its carbon footprint over its lifespan 
All interior finishes of the home have all been completed with non-toxic paints and finishes
15/20
All interior finishes of the home have all been completed with non-toxic paints and finishes
The home is anticipated to save 203 kg of carbon emissions per occupant, per year
16/20
The home is anticipated to save 203 kg of carbon emissions per occupant, per year
The home features a FSC hardwood clad exterior and a butterfly-shaped roof
17/20
The home features a FSC hardwood clad exterior and a butterfly-shaped roof
The 10 Star Home is priced at AUD$490,000 and is currently open to the public as a display home
18/20
The 10 Star Home is priced at AUD$490,000 and is currently open to the public as a display home
The home's design feature's maximum solar penetration for passive solar heating and cross-flow ventilation to heat and cool the home
19/20
The home's design feature's maximum solar penetration for passive solar heating and cross-flow ventilation to heat and cool the home
Architect David Martin from The Sociable Weaver
20/20
Architect David Martin from The Sociable Weaver

Melbourne-based architectural firms The Sociable Weaver and Clare CousinArchitects have joined forces to create what is claimed to beAustralia's first 10-star carbon-positive home. The stunning 10 StarHome was built with a zero-waste philosophy and was designed topositively exceed its carbon footprint over the lifespan of the home,anticipating savings of 203 kg (507 lb) of carbon emissions per occupant peryear.

"The10 Star Home is Victoria's first home to have a 10 star energyrating," Nat Woods from the Sociable Weaver tells New Atlas. "We believe it also to be the first home in Australia that is10 star, carbon positive and built to zero-waste and building biologyphilosophies – we like to call it the full sustainabilitypackage deal."

The10 Star Home was designed and created as an example of how asustainable home can still be modern, functional and beautiful. The160-sqm (1,722-sq ft) home was built using traditional construction techniques and producing as little waste as possible, with only three bags of trash ending upin landfill. The "zero-waste" goal was achieved by askingsuppliers to reduce packaging for materials delivered on site, whilethe rest was recycled or re-purposed. For example, plasterboardoff-cuts were added to the garden bed.

"Thehome follows standard construction processes," says Woods. "We deliberately optedfor processes and technology that are readily available in the marketand affordable. We didn't want to design a home that requiredexpensive technology or complex processes that not all builders arefamiliar with. Allefforts were [also] taken to ensure as little waste to landfill wasgenerated during construction."

The home is anticipated to save 203 kg of carbon emissions per occupant, per year
The home is anticipated to save 203 kg of carbon emissions per occupant, per year

Thehome features a Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) hardwood cladexterior, polished industrial concrete floors with underslab insulation,passive solardesign and abutterfly-shaped roof that offers high ceilings inside the home,maximum solar penetration for passive solar heating and cross-flowventilation toheat and cool the home. Furthermore, the home includes 5 kW of solarpanels on the roof, Sanden Heat Pump hot water service, 10,000-liter (2,642 gal)rainwater tank, double-glazed windows, LED lighting and non-toxicfurnishings throughout. According to The Sociable Weaver the energybill of the home isanticipated to be as little asAUD$3 (US$2.35) per year.

"Passivesolar design maximizes solar penetration through large north-facingwindows and thermal mass to trap heat during the day and then releaseit at night," says Woods. "We have used a new insulationtechnology called bio-Phase Change Material (bioPCM) which isinstalled in the walls and ceilings to trap and release heat. Even ona cold Victorian winter's day the home is still noticeably warminside without the need for any mechanical heating."

The interior of the home features a large contemporary kitchen which overlooks the open plan living and dining areas
The interior of the home features a large contemporary kitchen which overlooks the open plan living and dining areas

Theinterior of the home features a large contemporary kitchen thatoverlooks the open plan living and dining areas. Largefloor-to-ceiling glass windows take advantage of the beautifulcoastal location and soft neutral colors help the home blend into itsnatural landscape. The rest of the home is complete with a sleekbathroom and simple open bedroom designs.

The architects chose tofurnish the home with local and sustainable Australian products,including timber furniture made from reclaimed or sustainably-sourced wood, organic cottonmattresses and bedding, non-toxic cleaning products, air-purifyingindoor plants, and right down to bamboo toothbrushes in the bathrooms. Furthermore, the interior finishes of the home haveall been completed with non-toxic paints and finishes.

"Welove the warm and welcoming feel that the home has," says Woods. "As soon as youstep inside you feel relaxed and at peace – which is fantasticseeing as we use the home as our office!"

The10 Star Home is priced at AUD$490,000 (approx. US$386,400) and the home is currently open to the public as a display home. Thearchitects hope other builders and architects can takeinspiration from the home's green design and use the home as a modelfor future projects.

"We also want to continue to push the boundaries ofsustainable building in Australia, encouraging all builders anddesigners to think about simple ways that they can build homes thatare kinder to the planet," says Woods.

TheSociable Weaver is currently preparing to build its next home in theMullum Creek eco-village development, which is anticipated to be complete bymid 2018.

Source: The Sociable Weaver

3 comments
KeithDPatch
Ummm, how can this statement be true: "...the energy bill of the home is anticipated to be as little as AUD$3 (US$2.35) per year."? The article does not mention the inclusion of a residential electrical energy storage system. Without any battery to store excess electricity from the PV array for night-time use, you will have to purchase electricity to run the LED lights, refrigerator, heat pump water heater, etc. after the sun goes down. Best regards, --Keith @KeithDPatch
Robert in Vancouver
If global warming alarmists were honest (they aren't) they wouldn't use the word carbon when talking about CO2. Carbon is a black solid material that most people wrongly associate with black soot or diesel exhaust. CO2 is a harmless clear gas that is necessary for all life on earth to survive. But alarmists call it carbon because that's better for fund raising and their propaganda machine.
neutrino23
This looks very nice. Of course, they have the huge advantage of not having neighbors which gives them much more access to the sun. In a normal neighborhood you often have to deal with nearby buildings, trees, lots that don't optimally face the sun and such. Still, good construction with good insulation can help a lot. As to the cost being low, I would guess that they sell excess power to the grid in the daytime and use what they need at night. Also, if you have good insulation and a very efficient refrigerator and use LED light bulbs you can cut your electricity use quite a bit. They are using a 5kW array for solar power. That gives them about 25 to 30kWh of power per day. That is more than most homes need, especially very efficient homes. Selling the excess cuts costs. We refer to carbon because it is carbon as a fuel source that is turning into CO2 in the air which is the great danger for us. If we burned hydrogen we'd have much less trouble. Water is a greenhouse gas but it has a very short lifetime in the atmosphere; about two weeks. Plants need CO2, but at higher levels plants we grow for food are not as nutrients. High levels of CO2 acidify the oceans causing death to corals and other life and, of course, CO2 is warming the planet.