Health & Wellbeing

Wheelchair cushion could ward off ulcers by adapting to pressure

Wheelchair cushion could ward ...
The prototype cushion was recently presented at the ASME 2018 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, in Quebec City
The prototype cushion was recently presented at the ASME 2018 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, in Quebec City
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The prototype cushion was recently presented at the ASME 2018 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, in Quebec City
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The prototype cushion was recently presented at the ASME 2018 International Design Engineering Technical Conferences and Computers and Information in Engineering Conference, in Quebec City

Wheelchair users face a number of challenges, including the fact that remaining seated for long periods of time can give them pressure-induced skin ulcers. A new adaptive seat cushion, however, may keep that from happening.

Developed at the University of Texas at Arlington, the device is made up of individual electronically-inflatable/deflatable segments, along with a network of pressure sensors.

When someone initially sits on the cushion, those sensors create a digital map, indicating the areas of the body that are being subjected to the greatest amounts of pressure. The device responds by selectively further-inflating or deflating its segments, in order to redistribute the pressure so that it isn't concentrated in specific areas.

Additionally, after establishing a pressure profile when a person first sits on it, the cushion proceeds to vary that profile periodically, to keep pressure from building up in any one place. The technology could also be incorporated into adaptive linings installed on the sockets of artificial legs, that would minimize the chances of the user developing pressure ulcers on their stump.

"This technology has a multitude of applications in biomedical fields," says co-inventor Dr. Muthu Wijesundara. "We really feel that it shows great promise in helping patients and their caregivers avoid the pain of stress ulcers and sores."

Source: University of Texas at Arlington

2 comments
Saviour
Long distance drivers could also use this seating innovative technology i am a driver and it's not always available to you to stop your vehicle when the need arises!
VincentWolf
Man I need a seat like that just for my office which sitting at a PC for 12 hours a day requires something like this!!