Aircraft

Gulfstream unveils G400 and G800 business jets

Gulfstream unveils G400 and G8...
The G800 at the Gulstream presentation
The G800 at the Gulstream presentation
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The G800 cabin
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The G800 cabin
On of the G800 cabin plans
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On of the G800 cabin plans
Rendering of the G800
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Rendering of the G800
Rendering of the G400
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Rendering of the G400
The G800 at the Gulstream presentation
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The G800 at the Gulstream presentation
The G400 cabin
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The G400 cabin
ne of the G400 cabin plans
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ne of the G400 cabin plans
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Gulfstream Aerospace has rolled out its two latest business jets in a gala virtual presentation in Savannah, Georgia. Aimed at filling niches in the business jet market, the Gulfstream G800 is the longest-range aircraft to be built by the General Dynamics subsidiary, and the Gulfstream G400 is Gulfstream's first large-cabin jet in a decade.

In 2020, the business jet market was valued at US$24.21 billion and by 2028, it's projected to reach US$36.94 billion, which is not surprising when COVID-19 precautions are making commercial air travel less attractive to those with the money to avoid it.

As a result, Gulfstream is not only looking to make its jets more technically advanced, but also introducing ones that allow the company to spread its net wide in regard to potential customers.

Rendering of the G800
Rendering of the G800

In the case of the G400, Gulfstream plugging the gap between the super-midsize G280 and G500. Using the same fuselage as the G650ER, the G400 is designed for long-range, high-speed performance. Its twin Pratt & Whitney PW812GA engines punch out 13,496 lb each, giving the aircraft a long-range cruise speed of Mach 0.85 (562 knots, 647 mph, 1,041 km/h) and a range of 4,833 miles (7,778 km).

Inside, the G400 has a stand-up cabin that can seat up to 12 passengers in three floor plans, with up to two and a half living spaces.

Rendering of the G400
Rendering of the G400

The G800 is a long hauler. It can go for 9,200 miles (14,800 km) at a cruising speed of Mach 0.85 thanks to a pair of Rolls-Royce Pearl 700 engines and the wings and winglets designed for the G700. These configurations will allow the G800 to operate from small airports with short runways.

The cabin has four living areas as the standard plan seating for up 19 passengers, or three areas if a crew compartment is desired. Eventually, the G800 will replace the G650.

Both the G400 and the G800 share a suite of features, including the Gulfstream panoramic oval windows and Symmetry Flight Deck with electronically linked active control side-sticks and 10 touch-screen displays. Avionics boasts the Predictive Landing Performance System (PLPS) for advanced warnings of runway problems.

The G400 cabin
The G400 cabin

The G800 adds to this with the a raft of vision systems in a head-up unit that merges data into a single display.

"For more than six decades, Gulfstream has led the business aviation industry with our commitment to continuous improvement and by consistently setting new standards for safety, performance, innovation and comfort," says Mark Burns, president, Gulfstream. "Today marks a major milestone and investment in our company’s future with the introduction of the G800, our fastest longest-range aircraft yet, and the G400, the industry’s first new large-cabin aircraft in more than a decade."

The G800 will begin deliveries in 2023 and G400 follow in 2025.

Here's look at the introduction of the G400 and G800:

G400 & G800

Source: Gulfstream Aerospace

View gallery - 7 images
3 comments
3 comments
guzmanchinky
Well, these are cool, of course, but I'm guessing at some point these might become illegal from a CO2 emissions per passenger perspective. When you fly a large airliner it's not nearly as bad per person per mile as one of these. I regularly fly business class from LAX to Germany, and I'd much prefer a direct flight on a huge plane than making fuel stops in this one...
Smokey_Bear
meh. Looks the same as current ones, and goes just as fast (slow).
Almost all aircraft makers today are lazy, lost the drive to innovate, and all blend together.
Nelson Hyde Chick
guzmanchinky. Thinking prevent jets would become illegal is silly considering they are a rich person't toy, and the ruch rule. Better hordes of poor starve to death then a rich guy without his private jet.