Bicycles

​AirDonkey takes the sharing economy to two wheels

​AirDonkey takes the sharing e...
Once a user has booked a bike to rent, the Donkey Lock is unlocked via Bluetooth using their smartphone
Once a user has booked a bike to rent, the Donkey Lock is unlocked via Bluetooth using their smartphone
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Once a user has booked a bike to rent, the Donkey Lock is unlocked via Bluetooth using their smartphone
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Once a user has booked a bike to rent, the Donkey Lock is unlocked via Bluetooth using their smartphone
The AirDonkey kit needed to rent out a bike via the service will be available to order online
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The AirDonkey kit needed to rent out a bike via the service will be available to order online
An instruction panel is attached to the handlebars of the bike
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An instruction panel is attached to the handlebars of the bike
AirDonkey stickers can be added to the bike to make it easy to spot
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AirDonkey stickers can be added to the bike to make it easy to spot
The bike owner takes a photo of the bike and adds it to an AirDonkey listing
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The bike owner takes a photo of the bike and adds it to an AirDonkey listing
The AirDonkey app shows users where there are available bikes to rent
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The AirDonkey app shows users where there are available bikes to rent
The AirDonkey mobile app lets users locate, pay for, unlock or lock bikes available for rent
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The AirDonkey mobile app lets users locate, pay for, unlock or lock bikes available for rent

If you only cycle occasionally, a bike will just sit gathering dust or not be worth buying in the first place. A new service called AirDonkey provides a third option – a sharing system that lets people rent out their bikes when they're not using them or hire one just when they need to.

AirDonkey isn't the first service of this kind. Spinlister, for example, has been operating since 2012. Nonetheless, it joins a burgeoning list of sharing economy services.

Individuals who want to rent out their bikes will be able to order an AirDonkey kit online. This includes an instruction panel to be mounted on the handlebars and a Bluetooth-enabled "Donkey lock," which tracks the bike.

Once the owner has "donkified" their bike, they just need to take a photo of it, list it on the AirDonkey mobile app and leave it locked up in a public location. It's then possible to indicate when the bike is available to rent. If a bike owner needs to use their bike at some point, they can simply indicate that it is not available to rent at that time.

The AirDonkey app shows users where there are available bikes to rent
The AirDonkey app shows users where there are available bikes to rent

Individuals looking for a bike to rent must be signed up to AirDonkey and can view available bikes using the app. Once they have booked a bike to rent, it is unlocked via Bluetooth using their smartphone. The lock's integrated battery is said to last for up to 500 days between charges and the system requires no interaction between the bike owner and the renter.

Renters pay a daily fee for a bike through the app, of which AirDonkey takes a small percentage and the owner gets the rest. Once they have finished using the bike, they need only lock it back up in a zone set by the bike owner and shown on a map in the app.

The AirDonkey system has been trialed in Copenhagen and a Kickstarter campaign to fund the venture is due to launch tomorrow.

The video below provides an introduction to AirDonkey.

Source: AirDonkey

3 comments
Brendan Dunphy
I can see so many reasons why this won't work from flat tyres, to needing to adjust saddle height, insurance, downloading the app to competitive public schemes in major towns and cities - sharing gone too far?
Bob Stuart
I once rented a bike instead of a car in Seattle, and even from a dealer, it was awful. Bikes have to be properly fitted to work well, which is neither quick nor easy. I will never rent again, and have learned to never trust any casual user to not damage my good bike.
windykites
Bikes have been available for hire in London England, for a number of years. They are called Boris bikes, after the Mayor of London. The system seems to work. They are not private bikes, but are all the same type, and are sponsored by a Company.