Architecture

Oslo's leaning tower celebrates the expressionist artist behind The Scream

Oslo's leaning tower celebrate...
The Munch museum takes the form of a podium and tower and reaches a height of 60 m (200 ft)
The Munch museum takes the form of a podium and tower and reaches a height of 60 m (200 ft)
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The Munch museum takes the form of a podium and tower and reaches a height of 60 m (200 ft)
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The Munch museum takes the form of a podium and tower and reaches a height of 60 m (200 ft)
The Munch museum includes 11 exhibition halls and over 26,700 works by the artist
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The Munch museum includes 11 exhibition halls and over 26,700 works by the artist
The Munch museum features air-locked rooms with very high security to ensure the valuable artworks are kept safe
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The Munch museum features air-locked rooms with very high security to ensure the valuable artworks are kept safe
The Munch museum includes many of the artist's paintings, as well as drawings, letters, and even furniture from his home
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The Munch museum includes many of the artist's paintings, as well as drawings, letters, and even furniture from his home
The Munch museum features a restaurant offering views of Oslo at the uppermost level
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The Munch museum features a restaurant offering views of Oslo at the uppermost level
The Munch museum includes several versions of the artist's most famous work, The Scream
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The Munch museum includes several versions of the artist's most famous work, The Scream
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With its aluminum facade and leaning form, the new Edvard Munch museum cuts a distinctive figure on the Oslo waterfront. The building is hailed by Spanish designer Estudio Herreros as one of the world's largest museums dedicated to a single artist and features thousands of the famous Norwegian expressionist's works, including multiple versions of his masterpiece The Scream.

The museum, named Munch, replaces the original Munch museum built in the 1950s and recently opened after a lengthy design and build process, with construction starting back in 2016. It consists of a three-story podium and tower that reaches 60 m (200 ft) in height. As well as creating a landmark for the local area, the size of the building and its vertical layout ensures that a large number of gallery spaces are available and also allows for flexibility in ceiling heights and room sizes.

The Munch museum features air-locked rooms with very high security to ensure the valuable artworks are kept safe
The Munch museum features air-locked rooms with very high security to ensure the valuable artworks are kept safe

The interior of the building is arranged into two zones: one "static" and one "dynamic." The static zone hosts the actual art and features stringent security, plus airlocks and other humidity and daylight measures to protect it. The dynamic zone, meanwhile, is more open and features generous glazing to show off the view of Oslo as visitors move between the different exhibition areas.

The Munch museum includes several versions of the artist's most famous work, The Scream
The Munch museum includes several versions of the artist's most famous work, The Scream

There are 11 exhibition halls and over 26,700 works by Munch. Highlights include The Sun, as well as several versions of The Scream. There are other Munch-related items too, such as prints, photographs, and even letters and personal belongings. Other artists have exhibitions there also, notably the UK's Tracy Emin.

The Munch museum includes 11 exhibition halls and over 26,700 works by the artist
The Munch museum includes 11 exhibition halls and over 26,700 works by the artist

While it would be pushing it to call the building "green" due to its use of concrete, it has nonetheless been designed with sustainability in mind and features excellent insulation, high levels of air-tightness and the use of recycled materials, including its aluminum exterior.

"Munch has been built using low-carbon concrete and recycled steel, and its load bearing structure has been designed with a technical lifetime of 200 years," explains the museum website. "In addition, the building complies with Passive Building standards. In other words, energy consumption is reduced with the assistance of passive measures such as additional heat recovery, extremely well-insulated windows and excellent insulation. The wavy aluminum panels screen sunlight effectively, and also reflect and refract sunlight to avoid excessive temperature fluctuations."

Source: Munch

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