Architecture

Architects stack shipping containers for marketing suite in Hong Kong

Architects stack shipping cont...
A Work of Substance architectural studio has recently transformed four shipping containers into a stunning two-story office suite
A Work of Substance architectural studio has recently transformed four shipping containers into a stunning two-story office suite
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A fifth interior space is created by enclosing the fourth shipping containing with a large glass atrium
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A fifth interior space is created by enclosing the fourth shipping containing with a large glass atrium
The wooden flooring, walls and furnishings add warmth to the space
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The wooden flooring, walls and furnishings add warmth to the space
Westlink marketing suite features a large open boardroom located on the lower level
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Westlink marketing suite features a large open boardroom located on the lower level
The marketing suite is a refuge from the hustle and bustle of urban work life
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The marketing suite is a refuge from the hustle and bustle of urban work life
The space can be closed off with the use of the sliding wooden panels
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The space can be closed off with the use of the sliding wooden panels
A timber kitchenette is tucked beneath the open staircase
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A timber kitchenette is tucked beneath the open staircase
A steel-framed wooden staircase leads to the second level
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A steel-framed wooden staircase leads to the second level
A Work of Substance architectural studio has recently transformed four shipping containers into a stunning two-story office suite
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A Work of Substance architectural studio has recently transformed four shipping containers into a stunning two-story office suite
The architects built the marketing suite by joining three shipping containers on the lower level and stacking a fourth container above them
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The architects built the marketing suite by joining three shipping containers on the lower level and stacking a fourth container above them
The architects chose to add a fifth interior space by enclosing the fourth shipping containing with a large glass atrium
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The architects chose to add a fifth interior space by enclosing the fourth shipping containing with a large glass atrium
The natural landscape surrounding the building becomes part of its aesthetic
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The natural landscape surrounding the building becomes part of its aesthetic
A large exterior terrace overlooks lush tropical gardens
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A large exterior terrace overlooks lush tropical gardens

Hong Kong-based architectural firm A Work of Substance has recently transformed four shipping containers into a stunning two-story office suite. The project was commissioned by Chinese logistics company Goodman Westlink to be used as a marketing suite.

The Goodman Westlink project is one of the nicer shipping container conversions we've seen, boasting large steel-framed glass feature walls and gorgeous interior timber cladding. The marketing suite expands across a generous floor-plan of 192 sq m (2,067 sq ft) and is kept contemporary and minimal. The open interior spaces, combined with the large glass feature-walls, allow the natural landscape around the building to become part of its aesthetic. Furthermore, the interior wooden flooring, walling and cabinetry add warmth to the space, creating a refuge from the hustle and bustle of urban work life.

The natural landscape surrounding the building becomes part of its aesthetic
The natural landscape surrounding the building becomes part of its aesthetic

“We maximized the opportunity to have extensive glass openings, which allows potential clients to have an overview of the surrounds,” says A Work of Substance. “The layering of timber and glass softens the features of an inherently industrial product, establishing harmony amongst nature whilst bringing in light and tropical backdrops into the space.”

The architects built the marketing suite by joining three shipping containers on the lower level and stacking a fourth container above them. The lower level containers are raised slightly off the ground, eliminating moisture issues, while also leaving minimal impact on the site. On the upper level the architects chose to add a fifth interior space by enclosing the fourth shipping containing with a large glass atrium. The opposite side of the upper level also boasts a large outdoor terrace.

The architects chose to add a fifth interior space by enclosing the fourth shipping containing with a large glass atrium
The architects chose to add a fifth interior space by enclosing the fourth shipping containing with a large glass atrium

“Containers are multifaceted; a strong symbol of a logistics company and a celebrator of sustainable architecture,” says A Work of Substance. “Its modular construct naturally allowed us to use four containers to create six different spaces as a marketing suite for Goodman, with the flexibility to adapt to an evolving site.”

The Goodman Westlink marketing suite features a large open boardroom located on the lower level; hidden bathroom facilities; and a timber kitchenette that is tucked beneath the open staircase. The lower level can be used for board meetings or transformed into a large open space for functions or marketing events. The space can be closed off with the use of the sliding wooden panels, which are neatly hidden between the bathroom and walls of the board room.

The space can be closed off with the use of the sliding wooden panels
The space can be closed off with the use of the sliding wooden panels

A steel-framed wooden staircase leads to the second level, featuring the glass atrium and open work space for a quiet working zone or smaller meetings. This zone can also be used as an additional space for entertaining clients and conveniently adjoins with the large exterior terrace, which overlooks the lush surrounding tropical gardens.

Additionally, the Goodman Westlink marketing suite is designed so that it can be packed down and transported for re-assembly on other locations, without leaving a footprint on the original site.

Source: A Work of Substance via Archdaily

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