Architecture

Extraordinary high-rise fills cracked facade with greenery

Extraordinary high-rise fills ...
One River North is currently under construction in Denver's River North neighborhood and will reach a height of 216 ft (65 m)
One River North is currently under construction in Denver's River North neighborhood and will reach a height of 216 ft (65 m)
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One River North is currently under construction in Denver's River North neighborhood and will reach a height of 216 ft (65 m)
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One River North is currently under construction in Denver's River North neighborhood and will reach a height of 216 ft (65 m)
One River North will be topped by a rooftop terrace that features a swimming pool and garden, and offers views of the Rocky Mountains
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One River North will be topped by a rooftop terrace that features a swimming pool and garden, and offers views of the Rocky Mountains
One River North will be defined by a striking facade that looks like it has been ripped open and has nature growing through it
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One River North will be defined by a striking facade that looks like it has been ripped open and has nature growing through it
One River North's amenities will include a fitness center and a yoga studio
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One River North's amenities will include a fitness center and a yoga studio
One River North will feature a "trail-like" walkway that's spread over four floors
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One River North will feature a "trail-like" walkway that's spread over four floors
One River North is being developed by the Max Collaborative, Uplands Real Estate Partners, and Wynne Yasmer Real Estate, and is expected to be completed in late 2023
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One River North is being developed by the Max Collaborative, Uplands Real Estate Partners, and Wynne Yasmer Real Estate, and is expected to be completed in late 2023
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Following the completion of its first US residential project in Los Angeles last year, MAD Architects has unveiled plans for another in Denver that's also infused with nature. Named One River North, the stunning high-rise will be defined by its unusual facade, which looks like it has been torn open by an earthquake or some other cataclysmic event and has greenery growing through the cracks.

The building – which is being co-developed by the Max Collaborative, Uplands Real Estate Partners, and Wynne Yasmer Real Estate – gets its name from its location in Denver's River North neighborhood and will reach a height of 216 ft (65 m).

It will consist of 16 floors, most of which will be taken up by 187 rental units ranging from one to three bedrooms and 625 sq ft (58 sq m) to 2,500 sq ft (232 sq m), though unfortunately there are no images of the interior available at this early stage.

Elsewhere, there will be retail space on the ground floor, as well as 13,352 sq ft (1,240 sq m) of open-air areas, water features, and a landscaped "trail-like" walkway that's spread across four floors. The high-rise will be topped by a rooftop area with a pool, spa, deck and garden that offer views of the Rocky Mountains in the distance. Other amenities open to residents include a fitness center and yoga studio, plus a work area, lounge, and even a pet spa.

One River North will be topped by a rooftop terrace that features a swimming pool and garden, and offers views of the Rocky Mountains
One River North will be topped by a rooftop terrace that features a swimming pool and garden, and offers views of the Rocky Mountains

"The structure's most striking feature, a 10-story landscaped rift that defines its exterior, is inspired by Colorado's diverse biomes and recalls the experience of ascending from the foothills to the trail and canyon, to reaching the alpine plateau," says the Max Collaborative. "This unparalleled experience increases resident views and blends nature into the urban landscape."

One River North is currently under construction and is expected to be completed in late 2023.

Source: MAD

View gallery - 6 images
4 comments
4 comments
Aermaco
This looks very interesting as it metaphors "cracking" the "glass box" high energy consuming 50s thru 90s wasteful energy tower designs.
However, it does add more heat loss and gain with its open to atmosphere green levels.

I wonder if there was any thought to add the age old logic of a "storm porch" temporary glassing panel system to save energy and create a year round usefulness adding value and user friendliness to the inclement weather for a good portion of time living there?

It could be a sliding, unfolding or rolling skin &or panel system even as a lightweight single glassed heavy film enclosure it would greatly reduce the very low and very high temperatures. It would be heated and cooled by the heat & loss gain by the units that are adjacent to it reducing their energy costs, a win win.
BlueOak
Cool. Pre-configured for an Armageddon event.
Signguy
I read the article here that a new coating for glass, would allow light, but block the heat. A perfect trial.
Aermaco
The "e" films have been blocking heat for decades now on windows located on the inside of sealed double pain glass. It is a metallic very thin see-through mirror-like film as found much heavier on those chrome sunglasses, with no tech advance whatsoever.