Architecture

America's first triple net-zero development planned for New York

America's first triple net-zer...
Garrison Architects has joined forces with sustainable developers South End Development to create the very first triple net-zero mixed-use project in the United States
Garrison Architects has joined forces with sustainable developers South End Development to create the very first triple net-zero mixed-use project in the United States
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Garrison Architects has joined forces with sustainable developers South End Development to create the very first triple net-zero mixed-use project in the United States
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Garrison Architects has joined forces with sustainable developers South End Development to create the very first triple net-zero mixed-use project in the United States
The Seventy-Six complex will generate 100 percent of its energy demand via renewable sources, treat and reuse 100 percent of waste water and recycle or compost 100 percent of all generated waste
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The Seventy-Six complex will generate 100 percent of its energy demand via renewable sources, treat and reuse 100 percent of waste water and recycle or compost 100 percent of all generated waste
The Seventy-Six building design features photovoltaic panels and wind turbines
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The Seventy-Six building design features photovoltaic panels and wind turbines
The building design features a shared and scalable energy generation system, which incorporates the use of a ground source heat pump, solar thermal hot water, energy recovery ventilation, photovoltaic panels and wind turbines
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The building design features a shared and scalable energy generation system, which incorporates the use of a ground source heat pump, solar thermal hot water, energy recovery ventilation, photovoltaic panels and wind turbines
The water treatment system reduces all sewage and storm outflows via the use of water collection and filtering technologies
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The water treatment system reduces all sewage and storm outflows via the use of water collection and filtering technologies
All water and sewage waste will be either re-used, composted or incinerated onsite
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All water and sewage waste will be either re-used, composted or incinerated onsite
This project represents a seven-floor mixed-use structure, consisting of 69 residential apartments
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This project represents a seven-floor mixed-use structure, consisting of 69 residential apartments
The building boasts a strong focus on creating affordable housing, while also providing a healthy and eco-friendly environment for its inhabitants
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The building boasts a strong focus on creating affordable housing, while also providing a healthy and eco-friendly environment for its inhabitants
The Seventy-Six complex is planned for development in the heart of the South End neighborhood, located in Albany, New York
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The Seventy-Six complex is planned for development in the heart of the South End neighborhood, located in Albany, New York
Example of a studio apartment in the Seventy-Six building by Garrison Architects
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Example of a studio apartment in the Seventy-Six building by Garrison Architects
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New York-based Garrison Architects has joined forces with sustainable developers South End Development to create what they believe to be the very first triple net-zero mixed-use project in the United States. Dubbed Seventy-Six, the sustainably ambitious project aims to achieve a zero-impact development that will generate 100 percent of its energy demand via renewable sources, treat and reuse 100 percent of waste water and recycle or compost 100 percent of all generated waste.

The award-winning design concept is part of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority’s Buildings of Excellence competition and is planned for development in the heart of the South End neighborhood, located in Albany, New York.

“The project brings ground-breaking triple net-zero sustainability, resiliency, and beauty to the deserving South End community,” says New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. “As a proof of concept, this project demonstrates that conscious building can be regenerative, creative, healthy, integrated, and inspiring. By pushing the envelope of what a building can be and the purpose it can serve.”

This project represents a 77,609-gross-sq-ft (7210 sq-m), seven-floor mixed-use structure, consisting of 69 residential apartments, and with 11 percent of the structure allocated for business use. The residential apartments comprise a mix of studios; one, two, and three-bedroom units; duplexes; and modular dwellings that can be re-configured for flexibility or alternative uses. The building boasts a strong focus on creating affordable housing, while also providing a healthy and eco-friendly environment for its inhabitants.

This project represents a seven-floor mixed-use structure, consisting of 69 residential apartments
This project represents a seven-floor mixed-use structure, consisting of 69 residential apartments

“As proof of concept, this project exceeds state initiatives in sustainability and creates new opportunities for the local community,” says South End Development. “The Complex promotes well-being for every resident, partner, and employee. The Seventy-Six project represents a more robust and balanced ecosystem that will continue to be a positive impact on future generations.”

To achieve its triple net-zero status, the building design features a shared and scalable energy generation system, which incorporates the use of a ground source heat pump, solar-thermal hot water, energy recovery ventilation, photovoltaic panels and wind turbines. All apartments will be fitted with induction cooktops, heat-pump clothes dryers and energy efficient appliances.

The building design features a shared and scalable energy generation system, which incorporates the use of a ground source heat pump, solar thermal hot water, energy recovery ventilation, photovoltaic panels and wind turbines
The building design features a shared and scalable energy generation system, which incorporates the use of a ground source heat pump, solar thermal hot water, energy recovery ventilation, photovoltaic panels and wind turbines

The water treatment system reduces all sewage and storm outflows via the use of water collection and filtering technologies. All water and sewage waste will be either re-used, composted or incinerated onsite. Furthermore, the project includes a "Living Machine" urban farming model, with vertical gardens and aquaculture; combining marine life with vegetable plots. The farming infrastructure will be integrated into the building’s water filtration system.

All water and sewage waste will be either re-used, composted or incinerated onsite
All water and sewage waste will be either re-used, composted or incinerated onsite

“The Living Machine will utilize and demonstrate interdependent biological cycles to grow, clean, and maintain the environment including constructed wetlands, organics composting, and water reuse; that will help to achieve environmental justice by providing clean air, water, and nutritious foods in a non-toxic material environment,” says Garrison Architects.

The Seventy-Six Complex is in the early stages of schematic design and is one of 13 qualifying projects for the Buildings of Excellence competition.

Source: Garrison Architects, South End Development via Treehugger

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4 comments
4 comments
Daishi
It seems like they have thrown every thing into an apartment building with 69 units. I think there was a time before now (when solar panels were expensive) that sun tracking panels made more sense now the costs. maintenance, upkeep of such system is probably just better spent buying more inexpensive panels instead. Wind turbines? Where are they going to put them? Did they miss the memo that turbine efficiency requires being built at very large scale? Everything I have read on small-scale turbines says they provide negligible power at best. Running a full water treatment facility on site seems like a pretty complex undertaking for a single building and they are incinerating non-composted sewage on site? gross. It will take a community to run and operate this facility and the costs will need to be really high. For the same reason I don't think there would be much uptake if existing sewage treatment plants added apartments I can't imagine throwing my own name on the list for living at one. I could even see the neighboring buildings petitioning to block having a sewage treatment facility composting and incinerating sewage next door in their residential area due to the smell.
The Doubter
This is just a show piece, not likely to be emulated on any scale, IMHO. A maintenance nightmare too!
ljaques
A lofty project, indeed. PROs: Producing all its own electricity and recycling all its waste water is amazing. The greenery would cool and scent the area nicely.
CONs: The 12-ish stories would entirely shade a dozen homes directly adjacent to the project. I'm wondering how they could mitigate the noise of the wind turbines so it wouldn't keep half the neighborhood awake at night. As drawn, the gaps between the fencing on the open top floor could allow toddlers to fall through. Price of solar and water reclamation/processing is high, as is maintenance on all that, especially in freezing climes. The greenery might be dead and unsightly half to two thirds of the year.
Best of luck to them, but I'm going along with Doubter.
ReservoirPup
"heat-pump clothes dryers" - this solution is so extravagant compared to just hanging stuff to dry given the climate of the place