Architecture

Stunning Steampunk pavilion bends wood into weird and wonderful shapes

Stunning Steampunk pavilion be...
Steampunk is currently installed in Estonia's Tallinn Architecture Biennial event
Steampunk is currently installed in Estonia's Tallinn Architecture Biennial event
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Steampunk comprises lengths of hardwood that are steam bent using simple tools
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Steampunk comprises lengths of hardwood that are steam bent using simple tools
Steampunk was painstakingly created by steam-bending individual pieces of wood
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Steampunk was painstakingly created by steam-bending individual pieces of wood
Steampunk comprises steam-bent pieces of hardwood that are connected with stainless steel brackets
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Steampunk comprises steam-bent pieces of hardwood that are connected with stainless steel brackets
Steampunk is currently installed in Estonia's Tallinn Architecture Biennial event
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Steampunk is currently installed in Estonia's Tallinn Architecture Biennial event
Steampunk was designed by Gwyllim Jahn and Cameron Newnham of Fologram, with Soomeen Hahm Design and Igor Pantic
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Steampunk was designed by Gwyllim Jahn and Cameron Newnham of Fologram, with Soomeen Hahm Design and Igor Pantic
Steampunk's wood sections are secured with steel brackets
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Steampunk's wood sections are secured with steel brackets
Steampunk's design forms as a cross that divides the grassy mound it sits atop into four spaces framing views towards Tallinn's old city and the Architecture Museum
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Steampunk's design forms as a cross that divides the grassy mound it sits atop into four spaces framing views towards Tallinn's old city and the Architecture Museum
Microsoft's HoloLens helped speed up Steampunk's build process
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Microsoft's HoloLens helped speed up Steampunk's build process
Steampunk is a stunning structure that highlights the versatility and natural beauty of wood
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Steampunk is a stunning structure that highlights the versatility and natural beauty of wood

Installed at this year's Tallinn Architecture Biennial event in Estonia, Steampunk is an impressive-looking pavilion that has been painstakingly created by steam-bending lengths of hardwood. The build process was helped along by a Microsoft HoloLens-based system called Fologram.

Steampunk was designed by Gwyllim Jahn and Cameron Newnham of Fologram, with Soomeen Hahm Design and Igor Pantic. It sits atop a grassy mound and divides it into four spaces which frame views towards Tallinn's old city and its Architecture Museum. It's a stunning work and really highlights the versatility and natural beauty of wood.

The structure comprises varying lengths of hardwood that are secured using stainless steel brackets. The wood was individually steamed and bent, before being joined together in a process likened to weaving by the team.

Steampunk comprises steam-bent pieces of hardwood that are connected with stainless steel brackets
Steampunk comprises steam-bent pieces of hardwood that are connected with stainless steel brackets

During construction, volunteer workers wore Microsoft HoloLens headsets, which worked with Fologram's own software to display images showing how the wood should be bent and where it should be placed. This sped up the process compared to following 2D drawings.

"The Microsoft HoloLens is a mixed reality headset, meaning that it blends digital content with physical environments," explained Jahn over email. "It has a see through display and is completely hands-free, which means you can wear it while performing typical construction tasks.

"The biggest advantage of working with the Hololens/Fologram is it is able to accurately position 3D information directly within fabrication environments, and fabricators can effectively use this information as a guide for how long parts should be, what shape they should be, where they should be positioned, how a construction sequence should work, etc."

If you'd like to see it in person, Steampunk is on display at the Tallinn Architecture Biennial in Estonia, which has the theme "Beauty Matters: The Resurgence of Beauty" and runs until November 17.

The video below offers more information on the build process.

Steampunk Pavilion

Source: Fologram

2 comments
ChairmanLMAO
seems very impressive. like the verge of a new generation of structural engineering. looking forward to see more useful and asthetic designs.
buzzclick
I'm wondering if these Estonians are making a wordplay of the term. It first came to be recognized in the late 80's by the author K W Jeter. "Steampunk is a subgenre of science fiction or science fantasy that incorporates technology and aesthetic designs inspired by 19th-century industrial steam-powered machinery." Years ago someone looked at my sculpture and said Steampunk! Having never heard of the term and not fond of labels, I did a search to see the connections. Yes, they were there, but I didn't and don't really care for the commercial hype. Here it is a misnomer and I'm wondering if these Estonians did it on purpose.