Architecture

Stephen Lawrence Prize pops a cork for sustainability

Stephen Lawrence Prize pops a ...
Cork House consists of 1,268 blocks of cork
Cork House consists of 1,268 blocks of cork
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RIBA (the Royal Institute of British Architects) has declared Cork House the winner of the 2019 Stephen Lawrence Prize
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RIBA (the Royal Institute of British Architects) has declared Cork House the winner of the 2019 Stephen Lawrence Prize
Cork House takes its place well in the grounds of an 18th Century mill in Eton, England
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Cork House takes its place well in the grounds of an 18th Century mill in Eton, England
Cork House was constructed from a prefabricated kit without using glue or mortar of any kind
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Cork House was constructed from a prefabricated kit without using glue or mortar of any kind
Cork House consists of 1,268 blocks of cork
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Cork House consists of 1,268 blocks of cork
Cork House's interior measures 44 sq m (473 sq ft)
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Cork House
Cork House is warmed by a wood-burning stove
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Cork House is warmed by a wood-burning stove
Cork House makes use of exposed cork and oak flooring to offer a warm and snug space
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Cork House makes use of exposed cork and oak flooring to offer a warm and snug space
Cork House has ample natural light inside thanks to generous glazing and large skylights
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Cork House has ample natural light inside thanks to generous glazing and large skylights

Following its announcement of the 2019 Stirling Prize winner, RIBA has also declared the winner of this year's Stephen Lawrence Prize. Cork House, by Matthew Barnett Howland, with Dido Milne and Oliver Wilton, got the nod for its innovative use of cork to offer an attractive and sustainable home.

Created in honor of a black British teenager who was studying to become an architect before he was killed in a racist attack, the Stephen Lawrence Prize aims to encourage new and experimental architecture projects built to a relatively low budget (by architecture award standards, at least) of under £1 million (roughly US$1.2 million).

Cork House, which also involved The Bartlett School of Architecture UCL and Arup, is made almost entirely from cork by-product from the forestry and bottle stopper industries. Every building component used in its construction can be reused or recycled and the home can be dismantled and moved if required.

In total, the home consists of 1,268 blocks of cork that were assembled from a prefabricated kit without the use of any mortar or glue. It has an unusual contemporary appearance that nonetheless takes its place very well in the grounds of an 18th Century mill in Eton, England.

Cork House's interior measures 44 sq m (473 sq ft)
Cork House

Its interior measures 44 sq m (473 sq ft) and makes excellent use of exposed cork and oak flooring to offer a warm and snug space. A wood-burning stove is installed for warmth and generous glazing, including several skylights, ensure ample daylight within.

"Cork House is a unique fusion of ancient construction methods and cutting-edge technical research to produce a highly innovative, low carbon solution with a wide variety of applications from mass housing to emergency shelters," says Stephen Lawrence Prize founder Marco Goldschmied. "We are delighted to present Matthew Barnett Howland, Dido Milne and Oliver Wilton with the Stephen Lawrence Prize 2019."

Source: RIBA

3 comments
Bushpossum
No wheelchair access-FAIL!
Dusan
INTELIGENT SOLUTION....CONGRATS !
dandandan
Is the multiple roof spaces for acoustic reasons, looks or a structural necessity? I would have thought that would require more materials than a continuous roof.