Architecture

Greenery-covered high-rise will have more trees than a nearby park

Greenery-covered high-rise wil...
Urban Forest will rise to a height of 30 stories and is slated for Brisbane, Australia
Urban Forest will rise to a height of 30 stories and is slated for Brisbane, Australia
View 6 Images
Urban Forest will rise to a height of 30 stories and is slated for Brisbane, Australia
1/6
Urban Forest will rise to a height of 30 stories and is slated for Brisbane, Australia
Urban Forest will include over 1,000 trees and 20,000 plants
2/6
Urban Forest will include over 1,000 trees and 20,000 plants
Urban Forest will be raised on large columns envisioned as tree trunks
3/6
Urban Forest will be raised on large columns envisioned as tree trunks
Urban Forest will create a small public park area for the community
4/6
Urban Forest will create a small public park area for the community
Urban Forest's rooftop will include a garden area for residents
5/6
Urban Forest's rooftop will include a garden area for residents
Urban Forest's vast greenery will be irrigated from captured rainwater and recycled greywater
6/6
Urban Forest's vast greenery will be irrigated from captured rainwater and recycled greywater
View gallery - 6 images

With over 1,000 trees and 20,000 plants on its exterior, the Urban Forest will boast more trees than a nearby park in Brisbane, Australia. The project is hailed as one of the world's most densely-forested greenery-covered buildings by designer Koichi Takada Architects and, assuming it goes ahead as planned, will boast sustainable technology like solar power and rainwater collection.

Urban Forest will rise to a height of 30 stories and have a total floorspace of 55,000 sq m (592,000 sq ft), with 382 apartments.

Urban Forest will create a small public park area for the community
Urban Forest will create a small public park area for the community

The residential high-rise will be raised up on large columns envisioned as tree trunks. The sheltered space on the ground level below will serve as a small public park measuring 1,642 sq m (17,600 sq ft). Up on the rooftop will be a two-story garden area for residents.

"Vertical planting in high-rise buildings is part of a new movement that sees architects bringing greenery, biodiversity, oxygen and mental health benefits back to high-density city living," says the firm. "Urban Forest achieves 300 percent site cover with living greenery, featuring 1,000 plus trees and more than 20,000 plants selected from 259 native species. This is more than five times the number of trees found in nearby Musgrave Park."

Its overall form is designed to maximize natural light and promote cross-ventilation, while its greenery will provide extra insulation too. Other sustainable features include solar panels, rainwater, and grey water collection for irrigation use, as well as the use of recycled and sustainably-sourced materials.

Urban Forest's rooftop will include a garden area for residents
Urban Forest's rooftop will include a garden area for residents

The project is being developed by Aria Property Group and is awaiting planning permission.

Source: Koichi Takada Architects

View gallery - 6 images
6 comments
Mike Malsed
it's really cool - but what happens with the roots? Trees make a lot of roots, and those roots can be extremely destructive. Look at what they do with roads, splitting the asphalt or concrete. Nature has a way of winning over much of what we do. So what happens when the roots start intruding on the structure?
Jason Raines
I love this. It's so stunning and hideous, gorgeous and grotesque .... it needs a new word to describe it: beautifugly.
Username
There will be no apartments available as they will all be occupied by the full time gardeners required to maintain this!
Worzel
If one mature tree expires around 150,000 litres of water per year, how many millions of litres will this architects fantasy require?
I hope no one paid good money for this potential 'Bane' Bris or otherwise.
If a tree dies, and needs felling, where does it go? hiking numerous pieces of tree down 30 floors, is likely to be a bit of a bind. Also, from my experience, townies dont like trees, if they have to clean up the leaves. so I can surmise that quite a few trees will, 'disappear.'
sidmehta
No word on how the practical issues will be handled -- extra weight added by the trees and the soil, moisture that seeps in to the walls and the floors, roots breaking in the floor and ceilings, insects and bugs, etc. Full marks for innovation, zero for practicality.
ljaques
That is far too much greenery to be beautiful. Also, consider that all those plants will be hideous for half the year every year, usually all at the same time. Weight and water damage will also go against the safe lifetime of the building.