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Dyson's $650 Lightcycle Morph lamp is built to last 60 years

Dyson's $650 Lightcycle Morph ...
The newly launched Lightcycle Morph is based on the Dyson Lightcycle task light that the company introduced last year
The newly launched Lightcycle Morph is based on the Dyson Lightcycle task light that the company introduced last year
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The newly launched Lightcycle Morph is based on the Dyson Lightcycle task light that the company introduced last year
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The newly launched Lightcycle Morph is based on the Dyson Lightcycle task light that the company introduced last year
Dyson says its Lightcycle Morph lamp should last 60 years
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Dyson says its Lightcycle Morph lamp should last 60 years
The Lightcycle Morph is available in two variants, with the desktop version priced at US$650 and the floor version at $850
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The Lightcycle Morph is available in two variants, with the desktop version priced at US$650 and the floor version at $850
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Never one to approach the design of regular household items without plenty of pizzazz, Dyson has introduced a new lamp with the ability to assume a range of positions and give off different kinds of light. The Lightcycle Morph is capable of automatically adjusting its color temperature in response to the time of day, and is built to burn for 60 years with a price tag to match.

The newly launched Lightcycle Morph is based on the Dyson Lightcycle task light that the company introduced last year, carrying over the ability to mimic shifts in natural light by adjusting its color temperature and brightness. Based on the user's location, it does this via an algorithm and sets of warm and cool LEDs, which can be fashioned into different styles of lamp depending on what the owner has in mind.

Used as an Indirect light, the head can be swiveled so that the light bounces off walls or other surfaces to create soft background lighting, while use as a Task light faces the lamp downward for reading or studying and is designed to reduce eye strain. Feature light mode turns it upward again to illuminate a piece of art, while Ambient mode lights up the stem in a warm comforting glow with little blue light.

Another notable feature of the Lightcycle Morph is what Dyson calls Age Adjust. According to the company, a 65-year-old needs as much as four times the light of a 20-year-old, so it has designed its latest lamp to automatically grow brighter as its owner grows older.

The Lightcycle Morph is available in two variants, with the desktop version priced at US$650 and the floor version at $850
The Lightcycle Morph is available in two variants, with the desktop version priced at US$650 and the floor version at $850

A range of preset modes for studying, relaxing and waking up can also be selected through the companion app, while slide touch controls allow for manual oversight of the dimming and color temperature. All up, owners can program and assign names for up to 20 different light settings from within the smartphone app.

The Lightcycle Morph is available in two variants, with the desktop version priced at US$650 and the floor version at $850. Both are available in silver, black and brass color schemes via Dyson's website.

Source: Dyson

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7 comments
paul314
This is really cool, but the ideal of lamps lasting a long time is hardly new. My grandfather was a lamp manufacturer, and lamps that he made are still in service 70-80 years later. (New bulbs, yes, but the latest replacements are all LED and should last decades). (Also, does the Dyson have some kind of reset switch so that the light intensity drops back down when my kids inherit it?)
Signguy
For that kind of money I could buy 50 lamps over my lifetime.
aksdad
"According to the company, a 65-year-old needs as much as four times the light of a 20-year-old..." Of course they say that. It's called marketing. The marketing genius of Dyson far exceeds their technical innovation. I'll bet they could sell tap water for $20 a gallon.
Eddy
I do not think Mr. Dyson is getting value for money for his enormous reputed R and D investment. As previous customers, we were recently in the market for a new cordless vac but knocked back the very expensive V11 as it has no trigger lock and is uncomfortable / painful to hold on in use as lots of others have commented on without result. Evidently R & D do not read customer comments even though their work seems to add squillions over normal pricing to anything they produce. Ended up with a so far seemingly superior Tineco for somewhat less.
Worzel
Dyson's products always seem to be solutions looking for a problem, and maybe expect to catch those with more money than sense. For those prices, one could buy a new lamp every couple of years, as styles and tech changes. Not many people would be attracted by a 50's style lamp now, and the technology is way outdated. The rate of change of tech, is constantly accelerating, so Dyson's lamp will be obsolete in ten years and a museum piece ten years later. Maybe it will be a collectors piece sometime after that, but thats a gamble, if you should live that long.
mediabeing
Sure would have liked a lot more photos. At $650, I'm going to want to see the thing real well first.
TFC
If Dyson can convince people to buy a lamp at that price then it is not over priced. I, myself would ask if it can be reparable 100+ years from now because of the ROI.