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Kiko utilizes a laser to instantly measure the height of growing kids

Kiko utilizes a laser to insta...
The Kiko Laser Height Measurer is presently on Kickstarter
The Kiko Laser Height Measurer is presently on Kickstarter
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Kiko is claimed to calculate and display a child's height within half a second
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Kiko is claimed to calculate and display a child's height within half a second
The Kiko Laser Height Measurer is presently on Kickstarter
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The Kiko Laser Height Measurer is presently on Kickstarter
One charge of the Kiko's lithium-polymer battery should reportedly be good for approximately 2,000 measurements
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One charge of the Kiko's lithium-polymer battery should reportedly be good for approximately 2,000 measurements
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While it may not rate way up there on a list of life's annoyances, measuring a child's height in the traditional wall-marking fashion can be a tad fiddly. That's where the Kiko comes in, as it uses a laser to do the job quickly and easily.

Currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign, the Kiko Laser Height Measurer is manufactured by electronics company Magpie Tech. And yes, it can also be utilized to measure the height of adults.

The user starts by putting the pushbutton-activated device on the floor, then utilizing its upward-facing laser to measure the distance to the ceiling. In a nutshell, the device arrives at this figure by determining precisely how much time elapses between the light being emitted and then reflected back down to it.

Next, the user gently places the Kiko on top of the standing child's head, and takes another such measurement. An integrated microprocessor subtracts that measurement from the first one, to determine the child's height – it's claimed to be accurate to within 1.5 mm. That data is instantly displayed in metric or imperial on the device's LCD screen, plus it's transmitted by Bluetooth to a growth-tracking app on the user's smartphone.

Kiko is claimed to calculate and display a child's height within half a second
Kiko is claimed to calculate and display a child's height within half a second

And while the Kiko should be placed relatively flat and steady on the child's head, it does automatically calibrate itself to compensate for shakes and tilts. In fact, it's reportedly forgiving enough that children or adults can use it on their own, to measure their own height. One charge of its lithium-polymer battery should reportedly be good for approximately 2,000 measurements.

Should you be interested in getting one for yourself, the Kiko Laser Height Measurer can be had for a pledge of US$99 – assuming it reaches production, that is. Its planned retail price is $129. A Kiko Smart Scale is also being offered, for higher pledges.

You can see the Laser Height Measurer in use, in the video below.

Your Home Clinic, Kiko : LASER Height Measurer & Smart Scale

Sources: Kickstarter, Kiko

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9 comments
9 comments
vince
Why not make a laser that mounts on a doorway frame and points down towards a childs head and you simply hold a flat plat on the childs head and it measures the difference between the floor and the plate. You calibrate it by first measuring the distance from the laser mounted on the frame to the floor and then have a child step under the laser light path with a flat object on their head. Must easier than trying to hold the laser steady and in fact if a child wore a cap with a flat plat on it you won't even have to hold anything at all. Just have the child pull over the stetchable cap and stand under the laser beam (of course never looking into the laser).
Altronix
There are dozens of laser measureing devices (some a lot cheaper) that could do exactly the same thing in the same way, just by subtracting one measurement from the other. No need for this device to exist.
Miss Bea Have
I am so glad for this laugh before going to work, it is a joke right???Are parents so up in the clouds that they cannot enjoy the fun of the door frame measuring log, a ruler or book and a pencil. I have always enjoyed the "warmth" of a home with marks on the door frame.
martinwinlow
FFS! What's wrong with a door frame and a book!!! Our entire civilisation is disappearing up its own fundament with this sort of nonsense!!!
Jinpa
It is an expensive solution in search of a problem. Yardstick and pencil leave memories for decades. Then when the kid grows up, tape some pieces of paper together to get enough length to transfer the marks and dates, and give the young adult the gift of a memory roll.
DJ's "Feed Me Doggie"
Miss Bea Have, martinwinlow, you both beat me to the punchline! I still have 34-year-old pencil marks from my daughters, and 18-year-old chart marks on the wall from my granddaughter. As long as I have this house, I will have the markers.
DJ's "Feed Me Doggie"
Almost forgot! Miss Bea Have, please put an "I" after the "a" in Have. That will get you the long ae sound to properly pronounce your very enjoyable name.
Mark Windsor
I agree with previous comments - total waste of money.
Also, not all ceilings are flat, neither are the floors. If the two are not parallel then the reading will be out.
ljaques
I just love the outrageous prices people are asking for obscure and flaky hardware. LOL
Will it work on cathedral ceilings? Popcorn ceilings? Gym ceilings?
@Miss Bea Have +1