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Wheel Driver aims to put a ratcheting tool in your pocket

Wheel Driver aims to put a rat...
The Wheel Driver is presently on Kickstarter
The Wheel Driver is presently on Kickstarter
View 3 Images
The Wheel Driver, all packed down
1/3
The Wheel Driver, all packed down
The Wheel Driver is presently on Kickstarter
2/3
The Wheel Driver is presently on Kickstarter
The Wheel Driver's bits are stored inside of it
3/3
The Wheel Driver's bits are stored inside of it
View gallery - 3 images

Ratcheting tools certainly make it easier to tighten and loosen stiff bolts and whatnot, but they're not always that easy to stuff in a pocket or clip to a belt. That's why the compact Wheel Driver "luxury palm ratchet" was created.

Manufactured by Spanish tool company Micaton Ergonomics, the Wheel Driver does indeed look like a miniature car wheel. It has an aluminum central body with multiple titanium bits stored inside, and a tire-like rubber grip ring going around the outside.

To utilize it, users start by placing one end of its bit-holder shaft in a receptacle in the center of the wheel – one of the bits goes on the other end of that shaft. From there, it's just a matter of hand-twisting the wheel back and forth.

Depending on which direction its 72-tooth ratcheting mechanism is set to (via a switch on the back), this action will either tighten or loosen whatever the bit is engaging.

The Wheel Driver, all packed down
The Wheel Driver, all packed down

According to Micaton, the Wheel Driver can deliver over 22 Nm (16 ft lb) of torque, and has a 5-degree ratcheting arc.

The basic kit comes with six bits plus a magnetic screw holder, while the full set includes another 10 bits. Both are currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign, where a pledge of US$39 will get you the former, and $59 will get you the latter.

Source: Kickstarter

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5 comments
paul314
Cute. There are any number of cheap small ratchet wheels out there, but in this case bigger might actually be better.
Username
Why have a reverse switch? It would be mechanically simpler and stronger to have it one-directional and simply flip the wheel over to change direction.
mikewax
i have a couple of those in my toolbox and have used them maybe 2 or 3 times in my life. There's a reason why they're not very popular.
windykites
Why does it need a ratchet? It is easy just to twist, relax your grip, and twist again (like we did last Summer)(lol)
CAVUMark
This is a good product for those who do a lot of engine work. There are many times that a position is awkward or the nut or screw to tight and with the help of a little extra leverage the screw/nut goes on. Typically this is used with an extension as well for those hard to reach places. P.S. already have 1/4, /38 and 1/2" drives.