Automotive

Connect Easy pilot scheme to test package delivery to the trunk of your Audi

A digital code will provide DHL couriers with temporary access to the trunk of a recipient's car so that a package can be deposited
A digital code will provide DHL couriers with temporary access to the trunk of a recipient's car so that a package can be deposited
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A digital code will provide DHL couriers with temporary access to the trunk of a recipient's car so that a package can be deposited
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A digital code will provide DHL couriers with temporary access to the trunk of a recipient's car so that a package can be deposited
Audi suggests that customers will also be able to send letters and parcels from their car in the future
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Audi suggests that customers will also be able to send letters and parcels from their car in the future

Missing deliveries because you're out or the courier not turning up at the expected time is a common annoyance. If Audi has its way, however, it may be one that you don't have to put up with for much longer. The firm is piloting a service that lets couriers deliver to the trunk of your car.

The scheme is similar to the "roam delivery" service that Volvo was testing last year. Audi's Connect Easy Delivery service is being run in partnership with DHL and Amazon and is designed to ensure a package is delivered securely even when there's no-one there to receive it.

In order to use the service, Audi drivers must agree to their vehicle being tracked for the delivery timeframe. The DHL courier will then be provided with a code that gives temporary access to the trunk of the recipient's vehicle so that the package can be deposited. The code is valid for only a specific amount of time and expires once the trunk has been closed again.

Speaking about the service, member of the board of management for sales at Audi Luca de Meo explains that it is part of a diversification of the car's use. "With comprehensive connectivity, we are transforming the car into a service device and integrating it even more closely into the everyday lives of our customers," says de Meo.

By maximizing the chance of a delivery being made at the first attempt, such a service would be more convenient for consumers, improve efficiency for couriers and, as Audi points out, help to reduce the amount of traffic on our roads.

The pilot project is due to start in May and will be run in Munich, Germany. If successful, Audi suggests that customers will also be able to send letters and parcels from their car in the future.

Source: Audi

4 comments
phissith
What would happen it the trunk was not closed after the deliver, or my stuff were missing from the trunk (not part of deliver item). That's like trusting the DHL guy to the door to my home. A lot could happen accident or carelessness. Even outright theft. Understanding that I don't have Audi and even if I did I don't have to sign up for it. Just my constructive opinion that's all.
ahenning
Step 2, once the concept works, integrate software that will predict where the drivers will travel to and credit the car owners to transport parcels inter/intra city. Next use drones to deliver parcels within suburbs from car to car.
flylowguy
I wonder what DHS might have to say to DHL about this. It seems like there could be an opportunity to hack a system like this in a sudden and widespread way to produce some horrendous results.
Douglas Bennett Rogers
I always have it left on deck, even Robomow!
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