Automotive

Alpha Motor Corporation launches retro-chic Wolf small electric pickup

Alpha Motor Corporation launch...
The Alpha Wolf's battery reportedly provides over 250 miles of range per charge
The Alpha Wolf's battery reportedly provides over 250 miles of range per charge
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Dimensionally, the Wolf is much smaller than other
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Dimensionally, the Wolf is much smaller than other "small" pickups on the road
Details on the Alpha Wolf include LED lighting, 16-18 inch wheels, plus optional protective plates and rails for off-road use
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Details on the Alpha Wolf include LED lighting, 16-18 inch wheels, plus optional protective plates and rails for off-road use
The front trunk ("frunk") on the Wolf is not detailed for size, but could hold groceries or gear meant to be hidden from public view
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The front trunk ("frunk") on the Wolf is not detailed for size, but could hold groceries or gear meant to be hidden from public view
The Alpha Wolf has seating for just two people, with a simple but functional interior
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The Alpha Wolf has seating for just two people, with a simple but functional interior
The driver's instruments are fully digital and can be customized to match needs
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The driver's instruments are fully digital and can be customized to match needs
The Alpha Wolf is about the size of a small crossover-SUV, and includes a battery cooling/heating system plus a rapid charger
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The Alpha Wolf is about the size of a small crossover-SUV, and includes a battery cooling/heating system plus a rapid charger
The Alpha Wolf's battery reportedly provides over 250 miles of range per charge
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The Alpha Wolf's battery reportedly provides over 250 miles of range per charge
A rapid charging system for the Wolf is expected to provide a full charge very quickly, although Alpha does not specify charge times
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A rapid charging system for the Wolf is expected to provide a full charge very quickly, although Alpha does not specify charge times
View gallery - 8 images

What happens if you cross a 1970s Datsun 620 pickup with a modern electric vehicle? Well, you might end up with something like the Alpha Wolf.

The Wolf is a small truck. Truly small, like that Datsun was, fitting a market that is no longer served by today's "bigger is better" midsized and full-sized pickups. The Wolf was unveiled last month, with a couple of still images and some general information that boiled down to "It's an electric pickup truck."

Now, the California-based Alpha Motor Corporation has given more details of the truck's powertrain, batteries, and capabilities. If the name Alpha sounds familiar, that's because this is the same company that debuted the JAX rally car early this year.

The Alpha Wolf is about the size of a small crossover-SUV, and includes a battery cooling/heating system plus a rapid charger
The Alpha Wolf is about the size of a small crossover-SUV, and includes a battery cooling/heating system plus a rapid charger

The Alpha Wolf is truly a small pickup, seating two passengers and measuring just 188 inches (4,775 mm) in length. Its width is 76 inches (1,930 mm) and it stands 66 inches high (1,676 mm). The truck bed is 69 inches long by 65 wide by 16 deep (1,753 by 1,651 by 406 mm), for a total of 34.5 cubic feet (977 liters) in cargo volume.

For reference, those numbers are very similar to the dimensions of the Kia Sorento we reviewed recently. The Toyota Tacoma and Chevrolet Colorado (both midsized pickups) are about 35 to 38 inches (889 to 965 mm) longer than the Wolf.

That makes the Alpha Wolf a truly compact pickup truck. Performance is good, though, with a claimed total of about 250 or more miles (402 km) of range with its 75-kWh battery – larger batteries are likely to be offered. It has a 3,000-lb (1,360-kg) towing capacity, and a choice of either single-motor front-wheel drive or dual-motor four-wheel drive.

A rapid charging system for the Wolf is expected to provide a full charge very quickly, although Alpha does not specify charge times
A rapid charging system for the Wolf is expected to provide a full charge very quickly, although Alpha does not specify charge times

The Wolf is basically a small work and/or off-road truck that happens to be an EV. Better yet? Its price tag starts at just US$36,000 and tops out at $46,000 (not including any EV credits). That's less than one would pay for the lowest-end Tacoma or Colorado for sure.

Whether or not the Wolf or any other Alpha vehicle actually makes it to production – and with these specifications – is something we can only guess at. The company is currently accepting reservations from prospective buyers.

The Wolf marks four vehicles that Alpha has introduced so far, all based on the same electric vehicle platform.

Source: Alpha Motor Corporation

View gallery - 8 images
14 comments
14 comments
Steve Hines
Lowest price Tacoma starts out at $26400.00 That's $10000.00 less than the Alpha. This is the problem with EV's. They cost too much for the vast majority of potential consumers. Maybe Uncle Joe's incentives will make em competitive in price.
ElectroDyne
And the Chevy Colorado starts at $26395 (before incentives) for an extended cab 2WD. Also $10K less than the Alpha, like the Tacoma that Steve Hines pointed out. In fact, $36K (the starting price for the Alpha) gets you into a 4-door 4x4 WT with money left to spare (again before incentives).
Spud Murphy
Funny how the two commenters here are comparing a niche retro vehicle to regular mass produced vehicles, they have different target markets. Then consider that while EVs are more expensive to start with, their running and maintenance costs are vastly less, especially if you already have solar. It's not all about up-front cost, it's about TCO, and for business owners, having a vehicle that isn't off the road regularly for servicing adds even more value to EVs.
Unsold
I haven't seen a wheel to body ratio like that since HotWheels... lol.
fluke meter
@Spud - I believe the two posters you are complaining about were mainly reacting to the authors statement : "... That's less than one would pay for the lowest-end Tacoma or Colorado for sure. " Since in fact those two trucks start $10k less or 1/3 - that's a note worthy fact for readers..
Bruce H. Anderson
Let me chime in about the "bigger is better" ethos plaguing the SUV market. I parked my old 93 Suburban (same basic size as a pickup of the era) amid a row of more recent model pickups and took a picture. The difference is astounding.
More load capacity? No.
More passenger room? No.
Better gas mileage? No.
Larger frontal area? Oh yes! What an embarrassment.
Regarding TCO, there is the battery pack replacement to consider because it will decrease in performance over time (all batteries do that) and need replacement. My 93 had turned over 365K when I sold it to my mechanic. Original engine, still running like a top to this day.
DavidB
This truck really appeals to me, especially including the big wheel-to-body height ratio. (Big vehicles on tiny wheels look like overweight pugs—blech.)

I’d absolutely consider one of these, if it makes it to production with those specs!

Gregg Eshelman
They'll need a rear drive only option, not a front drive only option. People wanting to get a base model one without all the fancy stuff will want rear drive only to handle loads better.

Thanks to the "chicken tax" tariff bill putting a 25% import duty on light trucks, we haven't have pickups this size in the USA for many years. Initially, manufacturers were able to work around it by importing the Isuzu LUV / Chevy P'UP, Mazda and Ford Courier, Dodge and Mitsubishi D-50 and Plymouth Arrow trucks with the beds not installed as "parts". The Subaru Brat squeaked by as a "passenger vehicle" by having the two seats welded into the bed.

But those loopholes were closed and the little trucks were replaced by American or Canadian built larger trucks like the S10/S15, Ranger, and Dakota. Subaru, when they wanted to bring back something similar to the old Brat, had to make it a 4 door + open bed to make it "not a light truck" subject to the 25% tariff.

Ford imports their Turkey built Transit Connect vans with rear interior finish, seats, and windows. Then unless specially ordered with all that, they remove it all and replace the rear side and door windows with solid panels. They come into the USA as passenger vehicles and most leave Ford's hands as light trucks.

Today all that remains in force of the "chicken tax" bill is the 25% import tariff on light trucks. It did nothing to spur manufacturers to build the small trucks here, despite the market demand.

Since the imports were stopped, those little trucks have held their value. People will buy a rusted out hulk of a Courier, LUV or P'UP and restore it. I dunno about the Mitsubisi/Mopar ones.
Adrian Akau
Am interested in purchasing this size truck with internal combustion engine. The trucks today are getting too big.
Pablo
I used to drive small trucks, 3 D-50s, and an S-10, followed by a handful of Rangers. The reality for me was that my Ecoboost F150 is far and away the best truck I’ve owned. Yes, it has a Nimitz Class turning radius, to borrow a phrase from Jeremy Clarkson, but it averages 3mpg better than my last Ranger and I can tow a 30’ camper across the country and back at 75 if I please. I’ll start getting interested in an electric truck when it has my 800 mile (ok, not towing...) range, and I can expect to get 250k out of it before spending serious money on repairs.
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