Architecture

Hurricane-resistant home built from more than 600,000 plastic bottles

Hurricane-resistant home built...
JD Composites has completed its first concept home, built using over 600,000 recycled plastic bottles
JD Composites has completed its first concept home, built using over 600,000 recycled plastic bottles
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Armacell created the prefabricated wall panels for the home using PET (polyethylene terephthalate) core foam green technology
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Armacell created the prefabricated wall panels for the home using PET (polyethylene terephthalate) core foam green technology
The Beach House is a modern family home boasting a simple facade, seaside themed interior, energy efficiency and hurricane resistance
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The Beach House is a modern family home boasting a simple facade, seaside themed interior, energy efficiency and hurricane resistance
Second bedroom
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Second bedroom
The home features three large bedrooms and two bathrooms
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The home features three large bedrooms and two bathrooms
 Beach House is located in Nova Scotia, Canada 
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 Beach House is located in Nova Scotia, Canada 
JD Composites has completed its first concept home, built using over 600,000 recycled plastic bottles
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JD Composites has completed its first concept home, built using over 600,000 recycled plastic bottles
The home is a great example of how recycled plastic can be put to good use
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The home is a great example of how recycled plastic can be put to good use
The Beach House  is also hurricane resistant
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The Beach House  is also hurricane resistant
These prefabricated panels also provide the home with protection from moisture and mildew
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These prefabricated panels also provide the home with protection from moisture and mildew
These panels were made by melting down approximately 612,000 recycled plastic bottles
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These panels were made by melting down approximately 612,000 recycled plastic bottles
The Beach House has three large bedrooms
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The Beach House has three large bedrooms
The home features a large modern kitchen and open living
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The home features a large modern kitchen and open living
JD Composites co-owners David Saulnier and Joel German came up with Beach House concept
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JD Composites co-owners David Saulnier and Joel German came up with Beach House concept
These prefabricated panels also provide the home with excellent insulation
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These prefabricated panels also provide the home with excellent insulation
Over 184 panels were used to build the home, with each individual panel being shaped and cut manually, according to the home’s design
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Over 184 panels were used to build the home, with each individual panel being shaped and cut manually, according to the home’s design
The concept home provides an economic and fast building solution that is simple, modern and durable
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The concept home provides an economic and fast building solution that is simple, modern and durable

Canadian construction firm JD Composites has completed its first concept home, made from about 612,000 recycled plastic bottles. Dubbed Beach House, the home is located in Nova Scotia, Canada, and is not only a great example of how recycled plastic can be put to good use, but it's also hurricane resistant.

JD Composites co-owners David Saulnier and Joel German came up with the Beach House concept to provide an economic and fast building solution that is simple, modern and durable.

"Our idea isn't to make custom homes for couples looking to build a new dream home," Joel German tells New Atlas. "Our goal is to get in line with projects that allow for volume sales – smaller dwellings, shelters, sheds, offices, sleeping barracks. Disaster relief shelters are definitely on our radar."

The home is a great example of how recycled plastic can be put to good use
The home is a great example of how recycled plastic can be put to good use

The duo worked closely with Ontario-based firm Armacell, who created the prefabricated wall panels for the home using PET (polyethylene terephthalate) core foam green technology. These panels were made by melting down approximately 612,000 recycled plastic bottles into small beads, before placing them through an extensive extruding process.

"100 percent recycled PET foam from Armacell Canada is then engineered and developed to create layups and laminate schedules accordingly," says Saulnier.

"It goes through an extruding process that gives it its density depending on its secondary application – like aerospace, commercial windmills, or in this case walls for a home," German explains.

These prefabricated panels also provide the home with excellent insulation, durability, protection from moisture and mildew, and the ability to be assembled onsite within a couple of weeks, or even days. Furthermore, the panels were tested at the Exova engineering facility in Mississauga, Ontario, and proven strong enough to withstand extreme wind force, similar to a category 5 hurricane.

"We were able to send in a 2.43 x 2.43 meter [7.97 x 7.97 ft] panel for our ASTM test," says Saulnier. "We maxed out their wind testing machine as it put out max pressure on our panel. This was the equivalent of 326 mph [524 km/h]. Our panel deflected 6.2 mm [0.24 inches]."

These prefabricated panels also provide the home with protection from moisture and mildew
These prefabricated panels also provide the home with protection from moisture and mildew

Over 184 panels were used to build the home, with each individual panel being shaped and cut manually and according to the home's design. The end result is a modern family home boasting a simple facade, seaside-themed interior, energy efficiency and hurricane resistance.

The interior of the home features a large modern kitchen, open living, three large bedrooms, two bathrooms, indoor BBQ room and rooftop terrace. The Beach House also has large windows throughout, capturing the beautiful bay views, while also filling the home with an abundance of natural light and good airflow.

"A stairway that leads to the top of the living room, reveals a rooftop terrace overlooking St.Mary's Bay, Nova Scotia," says Saulnier. "It's my favorite feature. As well as the home's energy efficiency and the way it keeps outside noise at bay."

The Beach House is currently being tested out as a demo home and holiday rental, in order to triple check its durability and how the home's interior and exterior wear over time.

"We want to watch how the different materials we use on the homes react over time, things like paints and primers, monitoring the efficiency and different components," says German.

The overall build of the Beach House, including land, cost approximately CAD 490,000 (about US$ 373,850).

Source: JD Composites

7 comments
dutch
Two points I am not interested in~ what the interior design looks like and what this house costs with land price included. Two points I am interested in~ show me the extrusion processes with finished materials and what was the cost of the basic house less furniture, built ins and location costs
MerlinGuy
Just another company trying to ride the Ocean Plastic fervor. Overpriced modular homes made using inefficient methods and expensive garbage is neither the way to clean the earth nor the sustainable answer to affordable housing. Another 4 Ocean bracelet scam.
jerryd
I've been saying for a while PET bottles can be recycled into many things including replacing steel. Chrysler even built some nice EV cars from it. A great idea to make emergency shelters from. Such could be reused multiple times unlike the present throw away ones/trailers. And the focus should have been on the panels, how made, connected and their cost.
Edward Vix
Probably takes a fair amount of energy to produce the panels, then there's the small matter of off-gassing and plasticiser leakage into the sealed living space. No thanks.
mediabeing
Surely a seriously 'hurricane resistant' home would not look like that, but be lower to the ground and have rounded shapes, not 90 degree stuff.
Michael son of Lester
While I like the idea of this project, nothing is mentioned how well the exterior plastic would handle heat and direct sunlight. Considering how the summers seem to be getting hotter, what happens when the nice dark colored exterior is hit with direct sunlight on a hot 100+ degree day. It would also be interesting to know how well the plastic handles degradation from the sun's ultraviolet light.
GregVoevodsky
"Our idea isn't to make custom homes for couples looking to build a new dream home," Joel German tells New Atlas. "Our goal is to get in line with projects that allow for volume sales – smaller dwellings, shelters, sheds, offices, sleeping barracks. Disaster relief shelters are definitely on our radar." So, why did you make a custom hurricane home for example with a flat overhanging rip away roof in Canada and not Florida?