Bicycles

Airspy monitors tire pressure while cyclists ride

Airspy monitors tire pressure ...
The SKS Airspy (top, attached to valve stem) can be left in place while the tire is being inflated
The SKS Airspy (top, attached to valve stem) can be left in place while the tire is being inflated
View 3 Images
The SKS Airspy (top, attached to valve stem) can be left in place while the tire is being inflated
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The SKS Airspy (top, attached to valve stem) can be left in place while the tire is being inflated
According to the app, both of the tires on this bike are good to go
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According to the app, both of the tires on this bike are good to go
Both Presta and Schrader-compatible versions are available
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Both Presta and Schrader-compatible versions are available
View gallery - 3 images

It's important to maintain the proper air pressure in your bike's tires … enough so that a simple thumb-squeeze isn't always enough to go by. That's where SKS Germany's Airspy comes in, as it continuously monitors tire pressure, and lets you know if it's getting low.

Each Airspy unit consists of two joined parts: a cylindrical pressure-sensing module that screws down over top of the tire's existing Schrader or Presta valve stem, and an electronics module that snugs down onto that first module – a hook on the side of the latter allows it to be secured to an adjacent spoke.

As soon as the wheel starts rolling, the Airspy powers up, continuously monitoring the tire pressure. It also wirelessly communicates via Bluetooth or ANT+ with either an accompanying smartphone app, or a compatible Garmin cycling computer.

As long as the tire is within plus or minus 15 percent of its previously determined optimum pressure, a display on the linked device shows a symbol of that tire as being green in color. If the pressure is 15 to 25 percent too low, however, an alarm sounds and the tire symbol turns yellow. Should it go lower than 25 percent, the alarm sounds again, and the symbol goes red.

According to the app, both of the tires on this bike are good to go
According to the app, both of the tires on this bike are good to go

The Airspy unit automatically turns itself off if the wheel hasn't moved for at least 10 minutes. And as added bonus, it can be left in place as the tire is being inflated, acting as a real-time digital pressure gauge. It's said to be accurate to within plus or minus 1 percent of the actual tire pressure, and is compatible with both road and mountain bike tires at pressures ranging up to 120 PSI (8.3 bar).

Additionally, SKS claims that the Airspy is water- and dust-proof, and that it tips the scales at 18 grams (0.6 oz). Power is provided by a CR2032 coin battery, which should reportedly be good for approximately 500 hours of use – the app lets you know when it's getting low.

Both Presta and Schrader-compatible versions are available
Both Presta and Schrader-compatible versions are available

The Airspy can be purchased now, priced at US$144.99 for a set of two. Prospective buyers might also want to check out the similar Quarq TyreWiz – it goes for $199, but each unit includes a built-in warning LED, so they can be used with or without an app.

Source: SKS Germany via BikeRadar

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3 comments
3 comments
Trylon
Maybe waterproof and dustproof, but not theft-resistant. Can't leave these on any bike parked outside. Also behind the times in terms of technology. Should make a version that mounts directly in the valve hole for tubeless setups. And for $145, I'd prefer something that took advantage of the wheel motion to charge the battery, like a lightweight magnetic stator on the fork or stays with an induction loop on the spokes.
buzzclick
It's no big whoopee if your tire has gone flat while riding. You'll notice it right quick. If it's lost a little pressure, the rider may take a little longer...so what? Also, at 18 grams near the perimeter, will the wheels feel off balance at higher speeds? 150 bucks for a pair of these gadgets is nuts.
David V
Now this is just the kind of gadget that I find totally useless. You now need an app to tell you the pressure of your tyres ? Just look and squeeze them. Go look at the TorchONE helmet light on another post instead. Nearly half the price and useful.