Bicycles

Handlebar Jack keeps bar-mounted gear from getting bent

Handlebar Jack keeps bar-mount...
The Original Handlebar Jack in use
The Original Handlebar Jack in use
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The latest version of The Original Handlebar Jack improves upon a previous model, which utilized rubber loops instead of Velcro
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The latest version of The Original Handlebar Jack improves upon a previous model, which utilized rubber loops instead of Velcro
The Original Handlebar Jack, stowed for transit or storage
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The Original Handlebar Jack, stowed for transit or storage
The Original Handlebar Jack in use
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The Original Handlebar Jack in use
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While many people routinely turn their bike upside-down to perform repairs, doing so can damage handlebar-mounted components such as brake levers, shifters and e-bike screens. The Original Handlebar Jack is designed to protect those items, by keeping the bars off the ground.

Invented by cyclist Andy Wilkoff, the Handlebar Jack system actually consists of two small jacks, 3D-printed out of ABS plastic. Each one has a handlebar cradle on top, and three fold-out legs on the bottom.

While the bike is still right-side up, the jacks are attached to the handlebar grips via Velcro straps, and their legs are pulled open to form a tripod. When the bike is subsequently turned over, those legs hold the handlebars 3.25 inches (83 mm) clear of the ground, keeping any bar-mounted doohickies from getting scratched or bent.

The latest version of The Original Handlebar Jack improves upon a previous model, which utilized rubber loops instead of Velcro
The latest version of The Original Handlebar Jack improves upon a previous model, which utilized rubber loops instead of Velcro

As an added bonus, when the system isn't in use, the two folded-down jacks can be interlocked end-to-end, thanks to magnets on the insides of their legs. They weigh a combined 3.2 oz (91 g).

The Original Handlebar Jack is available now via the link below, for US$24.99 a pair.

Source: The Original Handlebar Jack

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2 comments
guzmanchinky
I had to look a few times to figure out what these were! Interesting idea. I've been lucky, I guess, I've never had to turn me e mountain bike upside down for anything yet.
paul314
This is nice, but you could buy a lot of cardboard boxes or blocks of scrap lumber for that price. Maybe if you regularly repair your bike on the road and don't carry anything else that could be used as a prop.