Bicycles

One Point Five is more than a unicycle, less than a true bike

The One Point Five was on display last week, at the Eurobike show in Germany
The One Point Five was on display last week, at the Eurobike show in Germany
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"Outre" is French for "extravagant"
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"Outre" is French for "extravagant"
The One Point Five was on display last week, at the Eurobike show in Germany
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The One Point Five was on display last week, at the Eurobike show in Germany

Bicycles can be awkward to store and to carry on public transit, which is part of the reason that Japanese company Outre developed its bizarre new One Point Five. It features what could be considered one and a half wheels ... hence the name.

First of all, it seems pretty likely that the designers of the One Point Five have at least seen the German-made Halbrad (or "Halfbike" in English). Like the Japanese bike, it also features a more-or-less regular-sized chain-driven rear wheel, along with a tiny pivoting front wheel located under the crankset.

While the Halbrad is a handlebar-less singlespeed, however, the One Point Five incorporates a vertical bar that's equipped with a brake lever and a Shimano RevoShift twist shifter. The former activates a rear disc brake and a band-style front brake, while the latter allows riders to shift between eight gears via a Shimano Altus rear derailleur.

"Outre" is French for "extravagant"
"Outre" is French for "extravagant"

Its front and rear wheels are 8 and 20 inches in diameter, respectively, so riders had better watch out for potholes. The frame, meanwhile, is made of chromoly, with the whole bike tipping the scales at a claimed 10 kg (22 lb).

Should you be interested in getting one, the One Point Five can be ordered via the link below, for ¥162,000 (about US$1,503). You can see it in action, in the following video.

OUTRE "ONE POINT FIVE"

Source: Outre via Bike Radar

7 comments
Quercus
Ludicrous looking thing. A sort of modern take on the "Penny-Farthing"
GordonHoffman
That's a fun video, but I wonder what it is like to start it going, stopping, going over bumps and pot-holes, and up and down steep hills.
buzzclick
You can forget about sharp turns and hard braking. Or rough terrain. Just cuz those 4 riders are smiling doesn't mean they're having fun. One point five is awkward. Fail
PAV
I don't understand why the smaller wheel is out front. Seems to me that if a big wheel is going to handle rough terrain better that you'd want to get it out in front so the smaller wheel can just get pulled through.
JoelTaylor
This is an older design concept (last seen in the 60's, look up the "Donkey Bike 1966") that has decided to make the rounds again. The basic design is known for having problems with uneven/rough surfaces.
Douglas Rogers
One scary bike but is will go in a bus or car a lot easier!
buzzclick
@PAV, if there's no wheel in front you'll have a face plant when you hit the brake. Not that this little wheel would prevent that from happening.