Bicycles

Pressed E-bike says ta-ta to tubes

Pressed E-bike says ta-ta to t...
The Pressed E-bike has already won both the Focus and European Product Design awards
The Pressed E-bike has already won both the Focus and European Product Design awards
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The Pressed E-bike's removable battery
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The Pressed E-bike's removable battery
The battery can be charged in or out of the bike
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The battery can be charged in or out of the bike
The Pressed E-bike has already won both the Focus and European Product Design awards
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The Pressed E-bike has already won both the Focus and European Product Design awards
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Ordinarily, metal bicycle frames are made from joined lengths of tubing. The Pressed E-bike takes a different approach, however, as its frame consists mainly of two pressed aluminum halves that are welded together down the middle.

Made by Italian manufacturer Leaos, the Pressed isn't the first of the company's innovative e-bikes that we've encountered – previous examples have included the carbon fiber-bodied Carbon City Design, along with a solar panel-equipped model known appropriately enough as the Solar.

Leaos founder Armin Oberhollenzer tells us that the Pressed's frame design allows it to be made regionally (in Italy), utilizing largely automated processes. As a result, both the company and its customers save money on manpower, and on transporting the bikes from someplace such as China. Additionally, the resulting frame is said to be relatively lightweight – the whole bike tips the scales at a claimed 15 kg (33 lb).

Riders can choose between five levels of electric pedalling assistance, provided by a 250-watt Bafang rear hub motor. The top motor-assisted speed is 25 km/h (16 mph).

The Pressed E-bike's removable battery
The Pressed E-bike's removable battery

Power comes from a lockable, removable 362-Wh lithium battery, that sits inside the top tube (no, the frame isn't entirely pressed). A single 1.5-hour charge – which can be performed with the battery in or out of the frame – should reportedly be good for a range of up to 100 km (62 miles).

Some of the bike's other features include Shimano hydraulic disc brakes, leather grips and saddle, and integrated Supernova lights. It's being offered in 5-speed and singlespeed versions.

Although the Pressed E-bike has been available since last year, Leaos is about to launch an Indiegogo campaign in order to fund further production. Assuming everything goes according to plan, a pledge of €1,990 (about US$2,182) will get you a singlespeed. Its retail price will be €2,990 ($3,279), with the 5-speed going for €3,450 ($3,783).

Potential backers can register to be notified when the campaign begins, via the Source link below. And for another take on a pressed-aluminum bike, check out the successfully-Kickstarted Mokumono.

Source: Indiegogo

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4 comments
BartyLobethal
These are still tubes - welded-seam tubes. Not even a new thing. The large flanges provide a handy seam to weld with a lower risk of blow-through (surely irrelevant if CNC welding is used), but they also add mass to the frame without contributing much in the way of stiffness.
ljaques
I can't see why any new bicycle is entirely free of suspension, front AND rear. Bicycling is rough. Add Sushprenshun, Preesh! // Is there a rear brake? // I'd like to have fenders, as a brown stripe up the butt of my pants id unsightly after riding an even slightly damp street
nick101
I had a bike when I was little that was partially made from 2 pressed steel sections, so it's not new. Still kinda pricey for what you get.
KiwiME
It looks elegant for what is is, a fairly crude frame design for 2020. Placing the battery up so high doesn't seem ideal when it's parked on the side stand. And 100 km out of 362Wh would be unlikely, 60 perhaps with light assist.