Bicycles

TiltBike promises a fresh take on tilting stationary bikes

TiltBike promises a fresh take...
The TiltBike lets riders lean into turns, but uses an elastomer-based system to create a realistic sensation of tension as they do so
The TiltBike lets riders lean into turns, but uses an elastomer-based system to create a realistic sensation of tension as they do so
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The TiltBike should be available before the end of 2022
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The TiltBike should be available before the end of 2022
The TiltBike features a handlebar-incorporated joystick control
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The TiltBike features a handlebar-incorporated joystick control
The TiltBike lets riders lean into turns, but uses an elastomer-based system to create a realistic sensation of tension as they do so
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The TiltBike lets riders lean into turns, but uses an elastomer-based system to create a realistic sensation of tension as they do so
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Tilting stationary bikes may be nothing all that new, but the TiltBike is claimed to take the idea further. It's said to not only simulate the feel of leaning into turns, but also the sensations of accelerating, climbing and braking.

Developed by London-based firm Muoverti (Italian for "keep moving"), the device is compatible with online interactive cycling platforms such as Zwift, RGT and Trainer Road.

As the rider goes through virtual turns in the onscreen environment, they can lean the frame of their real-world TiltBike into those turns accordingly – they can also simply push the frame from side to side as they pedal hard on the straightaways. An elastomer-based system creates tension as they do so, pulling the frame back upright as they come out of turns.

Additionally, turning the TiltBike's handlebars causes the user's onscreen avatar to make turns within its surroundings. In order to keep things realistic, the bars have a self-centering mechanism, so they don't feel like they're just flopping back and forth.

The TiltBike should be available before the end of 2022
The TiltBike should be available before the end of 2022

One thousand times per second, integrated sensors detect if the rider brakes, pedals harder, leans to either side, gets up out of the saddle, or otherwise changes how they're cycling. This data, along with factors such as the presence of virtual climbs or descents, is used to continuously change the resistance of the TiltBike's electromagnetic flywheel, further making the riding experience more realistic.

Users can additionally program in different virtual gear ratios, cassettes and groupsets, in order to match the feel of those made by top-end manufacturers. They can also swap in different real-world handlebars, cranks, pedals and saddles, plus they can even go back and forth between different system-specific frames, such as those of time trial or mountain bikes.

And as an added bonus, a joystick control on the bars lets users navigate onscreen menus, or play cycling-based video games.

The TiltBike is presently in pre-production prototype form. We're told that it should be commercially available before the end of next year, with pricing expected to be "in line with the top models from leading competitors."

In the meantime, it can be seen in action in the following video.

Introducing TiltBikes by Muoverti

Source: Muoverti via Gear Junkie

View gallery - 3 images
3 comments
3 comments
niio
Tilting stationary bikes are ridiculous. The reason you lean into a turn on a normal bike is to balance centripetal and gravity forces over the wheels. A stationary bike can't generate centripetal force, so tilting only makes it difficult to pedal properly.
Trylon
Agreed with niio. Anyone who ever sat on a Hang-On video game back in the 1980s would have their hunch confirmed that a tilting "bike" does not in any way, shape or form feel like cornering on a real bike. You're just hanging on, trying not to fall off as it tilts.
Aermaco
When you corner on two wheels you lean so your Center of Gravity/Interia stays directly in line with the wheel's axis and do not tip over.
This is a gimmick that is NOT a realistic real-world simulation but it may still provide entertainment?