Photography

Review: Hands-on with the Boomr bungee cord camera strap

Review: Hands-on with the Boom...
The Boomr camera strap uses an internal bungee cord system to maximize comfort
The Boomr camera strap uses an internal bungee cord system to maximize comfort
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The Boomr camera strap uses an internal bungee cord system to maximize comfort
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The Boomr camera strap uses an internal bungee cord system to maximize comfort
The Boomr camera strap is adjustable in length from 44 to 58 inches (111 to 147 cm)
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The Boomr camera strap is adjustable in length from 44 to 58 inches (111 to 147 cm)
The Boomr camera strap from StatGear is currently looking for funding on Kickstarter
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The Boomr camera strap from StatGear is currently looking for funding on Kickstarter
The Boomr camera strap promises to make carrying your camera more comfortable
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The Boomr camera strap promises to make carrying your camera more comfortable
The Boomr camera strap uses built-in bungee cords to act as shock absorbers
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The Boomr camera strap uses built-in bungee cords to act as shock absorbers
The Boomr camera strap from StatGear is currently looking for funding on Kickstarter
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The Boomr camera strap from StatGear is currently looking for funding on Kickstarter
The moisture resistant mesh on the underside of the Boomr helps it from becoming too sweaty
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The moisture resistant mesh on the underside of the Boomr helps it from becoming too sweaty
The Boomr camera strap can be worn as a standard neck strap
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The Boomr camera strap can be worn as a standard neck strap
The Boomr camera strap can be worn as a cross body strap
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The Boomr camera strap can be worn as a cross body strap
The Boomr camera strap can be worn as a shoulder strap
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The Boomr camera strap can be worn as a shoulder strap
The bungee cord in the Boomr camera strap give it a bounce which can take time to get used to
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The bungee cord in the Boomr camera strap give it a bounce which can take time to get used to
The Boomr camera strap features anodized iron carabiners
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The Boomr camera strap features anodized iron carabiners
The Boomr camera strap can be worn in a number of different ways
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The Boomr camera strap can be worn in a number of different ways
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There are no shortage of camera straps out there which promise to make carrying your interchangeable-lens shooter more comfortable. The Boomr, which is currently the subject of a crowdfunding campaign, aims to do this by using built-in bungee cords to act as shock absorbers. We recently spent some time with a pre-production model to see whether the Boomr is worthy of bouncing its way onto your camera.

The Boomr camera strap is being launched on Kickstarter by StatGear, which has previously produced survival gadgets including the T3 Tactical Auto Rescue Tool, and has five successfully-funded Kickstarter campaigns under its belt. The idea behind the strap is said to be making it more comfortable to carry a big camera for longer periods of time.

The strap consists of a polypropylene shoulder strap filled with memory foam, 1-inch heavy duty bungee cords, and anodized iron carabiners and D Rings to attach it to your camera securely. Adjusting in length from 44 to 58 inches (111 to 147 cm) the strap can be worn as a neck strap, a cross-body sling, or over the shoulder.

The Boomr camera strap can be worn in a number of different ways
The Boomr camera strap can be worn in a number of different ways

We recently got the chance to take the Boomr strap for a spin, to see how it compares to our usual BlackRapid Curve strap, and offerings like the CustomSLR Dual Strap which we recently tested. The strap we were using on this occasion was a pre-production model, so that’s worth taking into account when considering our findings.

First impressions are that the Boomr strap is of a very high quality compared to a lot of straps on the market, and certainly the ones cameras ship with. It’s an instant upgrade in that regard. The memory foam padded shoulder strap is comfortable, and the moisture-resistant mesh on the underside helps it from becoming too sweaty even when wearing it for several hours.

Our only negative about the build of the strap is that the carabiners and D Rings seem thin compared to those on some rival straps, and we’d have liked to see a locking mechanism like those on BlackRapid carabiners. When we raised this issue with StatGear, it said the strap has been rated for 13 lb (5.9 kg), and that it will add a US$50,000 stretch goal to include heavy-duty carabiners, possibly with the threaded locking mechanism.

The Boomr camera strap from StatGear is currently looking for funding on Kickstarter
The Boomr camera strap from StatGear is currently looking for funding on Kickstarter

Comfort-wise the Boomr strap achieves its goal of making carrying a large camera more comfortable, to a certain extent. The spring of the bungee strap helped make our full-frame camera feel less hefty, though the bounce that is introduced takes some getting used to, and can be annoying, especially if you’ve got a large lens attached. With a small prime on the strap felt great, but with a larger telephoto attached the camera felt like it was moving around way too much.

In our experience the strap also works best as a neck strap, albeit a long one even at the shorter settings. As a cross-body strap it lacks the smooth sliding movement of some rivals, but this was probably unable to be implemented because of the bunched-up polypropylene over the bungee. We also found that when using the strap in this way the bounce became more prominent and frustrating, and a camera bobbing around at your side feels more exposed than one around your neck.

The Boomr camera strap promises to make carrying your camera more comfortable
The Boomr camera strap promises to make carrying your camera more comfortable

In conclusion, there's still room for improvement, but the Boomr looks like it could be a pretty decent addition to the range of camera straps available, and one which could appeal to DSLR users who find the weight of their camera too much. We’d say the strap works best for small to medium-sized interchangeable-lens cameras with smaller lenses – so not a full-frame DSLR with a 70-200-mm F2.8 mounted.

A super early-bird Kickstarter pledge of US$25 will currently get you a Boomr bungee camera strap with prices rising to an early-bird $29 when those have gone, and $34 if those are also snapped up. If the $25,000 funding target is met by December 23rd, and everything else also goes to plan, the straps should start shipping in February 2016.

You can check out the Kickstarter video for the Boomr camera strap below.

Sources: StatGear, Kickstarter

BOOMR - The Most Comfortable Camera Strap EVER!

View gallery - 13 images
4 comments
Keith Reeder
Ho hum...
If I used on my gripped 7D Mk II, Sigma 120-300mm f/2.8 and 2x, it'd be down to my ankles.
In other words - it's great for reducing the perceived weight of combos that aren't that heavy in the first place. Just what we need.
I'll stick to my Op/Tech Utility Strap Sling - I can go for hours and hours with that, and it's cheaper, too.
owlbeyou
While checking out this article, 2 things came to mind:
The strength of the bungee feature would have to be able to take the weight of a lighter set up of body/lens, as well as one with a bigger/heavier lens, which means a possible compromise.
Manufacturers should provide attachment points at the bottom of the body as well as the top. Has anyone not thought of this before?
Calson
This strap is inferior in every regard to the Tamrac N25 neoprene quick release camera strap. The Tamrac using a single piece of neoprene that not only absorbs shock with a heavy camera and lens attached, it also conforms to your shoulder and so the strap is much less likely to slip off and send the camera and lens crashing to the ground.
The quick release buckles are plastic and so will not scratch the sides of the camera (greatly decreasing its resale value) or catch on clothing like the strap being reviewed for this article. These are also the only buckles I have used that never come apart accidentally and this would also be disastrous as this would also result in the camera and lens falling to the ground.
I have been using the Tamrac straps on all my cameras for more than a decade and they still are good as when purchased new. They are a favorite gift of mine to fellow photographers who once they use one would never go back to a rigid one.
I have bought camera straps that cost 5 times as much and ended up in the trash. The Tamrac are the best camera straps at any price.
Calson
Far better is the recently discontinued Tamrac neoprene straps with quick release buckles (after seeing them discontinued by the Gura Gear people who bought Tamrac I bought 3 spares). The neoprene acts as a shock absorber but equally important is that it conforms to ones shoulder and provides good friction to keep the strap from sliding off. With the quick release buckles I can remove the strap quickly after mounting a camera and lens to a tripod and get it completely out of the way.