Automotive

Bosch and Daimler get official approval for driverless automated parking system

Visitors to the Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart can now take advantage of the first officially-approved driverless automated valet parking system
Visitors to the Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart can now take advantage of the first officially-approved driverless automated valet parking system
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Visitors to the Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart can now take advantage of the first officially-approved driverless automated valet parking system
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Visitors to the Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart can now take advantage of the first officially-approved driverless automated valet parking system
Bosch and Daimler have been working on the driverless, automated valet parking system since 2015
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Bosch and Daimler have been working on the driverless, automated valet parking system since 2015
Bosch sensor technology has been installed throughout the parking facility at the Mercedes-Benz Museum to accommodate the driverless, automated parking system
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Bosch sensor technology has been installed throughout the parking facility at the Mercedes-Benz Museum to accommodate the driverless, automated parking system
A compatible Mercedes vehicle converts data wirelessly received from Bosch sensors into driving maneuvers, including driving up or down ramps and reacting to obstacles
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A compatible Mercedes vehicle converts data wirelessly received from Bosch sensors into driving maneuvers, including driving up or down ramps and reacting to obstacles
Lighting on the compatible Mercedes vehicles changes color to indicate that the car is in full autonomous driving mode
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Lighting on the compatible Mercedes vehicles changes color to indicate that the car is in full autonomous driving mode
A compatible Mercedes vehicle converts data wirelessly received from Bosch sensors into driving maneuvers
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A compatible Mercedes vehicle converts data wirelessly received from Bosch sensors into driving maneuvers
Visitors to the Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart can now take advantage of the first officially-approved driverless automated valet parking system
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Visitors to the Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart can now take advantage of the first officially-approved driverless automated valet parking system

Over the years, we've seen a number of solutions aimed at automatically parking the car so that drivers don't have to, including fully automated facilities that move vehicles on platforms, parking robots and even auto-parking features in some modern cars. Bosch and Daimler say that their app-controlled system is the first fully autonomous, completely driverless parking service to be officially approved by authorities for everyday use.

The fully automated valet parking system is now is daily use at the Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart after being given the seal of approval by the Stuttgart regional administrative authority and the state of Baden-Württemberg's transportation ministry. Not only has a special permit been granted following assessment by the German technical inspection service TÜV Rheinland, but a blueprint for other similar projects around the globe has been devised.

Bosch sensor technology has been installed throughout the parking facility at the Mercedes-Benz Museum to accommodate the driverless, automated parking system
Bosch sensor technology has been installed throughout the parking facility at the Mercedes-Benz Museum to accommodate the driverless, automated parking system

With Bosch taking care of the infrastructure at the Museum facility and Daimler providing the vehicle technology, a driver of a compatible vehicle pulls into the parking garage, exits the car and whips out their smartphone. After setting the automated valet service in motion via an app, the driver then leaves the garage and the car drives itself to a designated space within the structure and parks up.

Bosch sensors throughout the multi-story facility constantly monitor the driving corridors and send data to the car wirelessly, where the vehicle converts this info into driving maneuvers, including driving up or down ramps and reacting to obstacles.

The driver opens the app again when it's time to leave and the car delivers itself to a drop-off point.

Bosch and Daimler have been working on the driverless, automated valet parking system since 2015
Bosch and Daimler have been working on the driverless, automated valet parking system since 2015

Bosch and Daimler started working on the project in 2015, and the first fruits of the collaboration were announced two years later when the automated valet service was presented to the public for the first time. But until now, museum visitors using the pilot service had to be accompanied by trained personnel. With the green light from the authorities, drivers can now go it alone.

"This approval from the Baden-Württemberg authorities sets a precedent for obtaining approval in the future for the parking service in parking garages around the world," said Daimler's Dr. Michael Hafner. "As a pioneer in automated driving, our project paves the way for automated valet parking to go into mass production in the future."

Source: Daimler

Over the years, we've seen a number of solutions aimed at automatically parking the car so that drivers don't have to, including fully automated facilities that move vehicles on platforms, parking robots and even auto-parking features in some modern cars. Bosch and Daimler say that their app-controlled system is the first fully autonomous, completely driverless parking service to be officially approved by authorities for everyday use.

The fully automated valet parking system is now is daily use at the Mercedes-Benz Museum in Stuttgart after being given the seal of approval by the Stuttgart regional administrative authority and the state of Baden-Württemberg's transportation ministry. Not only has a special permit been granted following assessment by the German technical inspection service TÜV Rheinland, but a blueprint for other similar projects around the globe has been devised.

Bosch sensor technology has been installed throughout the parking facility at the Mercedes-Benz Museum to accommodate the driverless, automated parking system
Bosch sensor technology has been installed throughout the parking facility at the Mercedes-Benz Museum to accommodate the driverless, automated parking system

With Bosch taking care of the infrastructure at the Museum facility and Daimler providing the vehicle technology, a driver of a compatible vehicle pulls into the parking garage, exits the car and whips out their smartphone. After setting the automated valet service in motion via an app, the driver then leaves the garage and the car drives itself to a designated space within the structure and parks up.

Bosch sensors throughout the multi-story facility constantly monitor the driving corridors and send data to the car wirelessly, where the vehicle converts this info into driving maneuvers, including driving up or down ramps and reacting to obstacles.

The driver opens the app again when it's time to leave and the car delivers itself to a drop-off point.

Bosch and Daimler have been working on the driverless, automated valet parking system since 2015
Bosch and Daimler have been working on the driverless, automated valet parking system since 2015

Bosch and Daimler started working on the project in 2015, and the first fruits of the collaboration were announced two years later when the automated valet service was presented to the public for the first time. But until now, museum visitors using the pilot service had to be accompanied by trained personnel. With the green light from the authorities, drivers can now go it alone.

"This approval from the Baden-Württemberg authorities sets a precedent for obtaining approval in the future for the parking service in parking garages around the world," said Daimler's Dr. Michael Hafner. "As a pioneer in automated driving, our project paves the way for automated valet parking to go into mass production in the future."

Source: Daimler

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