Electronics

Artist illuminates the Uluru desert with 50,000 glowing spheres

Artist illuminates the Uluru d...
Field of Light comprises 50,000 frosted glass spheres on stems
Field of Light comprises 50,000 frosted glass spheres on stems
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Field of Light's is powered by 36 portable solar panels
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Field of Light's is powered by 36 portable solar panels
Field of Light comprises 50,000 frosted glass spheres on stems
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Field of Light comprises 50,000 frosted glass spheres on stems
Field of Light was conceived by British artist Bruce Munro
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Field of Light was conceived by British artist Bruce Munro
Field of Light's spheres, stems and cables are illuminated in a host of different colors
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Field of Light's spheres, stems and cables are illuminated in a host of different colors
Field of Light uses 144 projectors as light sources
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Field of Light uses 144 projectors as light sources
Field of Light makes the otherwise dark 49,000-sq m (527,000-sq ft) area on which it is installed awash with color
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Field of Light makes the otherwise dark 49,000-sq m (527,000-sq ft) area on which it is installed awash with color
Field of Light has a diameter of 250 m (820 ft)
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Field of Light has a diameter of 250 m (820 ft)
The Field of Light installation is located near Uluru in Australia
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The Field of Light installation is located near Uluru in Australia
Bruce Munro conceived of the Field of Light installation during a visit to Uluru in 1992
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Bruce Munro conceived of the Field of Light installation during a visit to Uluru in 1992
Field of Light has been exhibited in a number of other places since 2004
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Field of Light has been exhibited in a number of other places since 2004
The Field of Light the stems weigh around 15 tonnes (16.5 tons) in total
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The Field of Light the stems weigh around 15 tonnes (16.5 tons) in total
The equipment for Field of Light was transported more than 19,000 km (11,800 mi) to be exhibited at Uluru
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The equipment for Field of Light was transported more than 19,000 km (11,800 mi) to be exhibited at Uluru
Field of Light took over 2,800 hours to design and build in the UK and a further 3,900 hours to recreate on site
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Field of Light took over 2,800 hours to design and build in the UK and a further 3,900 hours to recreate on site
Field of Light's 50,000 spheres are connected by over 380 km (236 mi) optical fiber cable
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Field of Light's 50,000 spheres are connected by over 380 km (236 mi) optical fiber cable
View gallery - 14 images

You may think that Australia's Uluru, or Ayers Rock, is majestic enough. British artist Bruce Munro, however, has created a solar-powered light installation close to the rock formation that he hopes will give visitors an even more magical experience.

Munro conceived of his idea for an artwork that would "bloom at night" during a visit to Uluru in 1992 and has been planning for it to be exhibited there ever since. While it's been developed and exhibited in a number of places in the meantime, only now has it come to the place for which the idea was originally conceived.

The Field of Light installation comprises 50,000 frosted glass spheres on stems, which are connected by over 380 km (236 mi) of fiber optic cable. Using 144 projectors as light sources, the spheres, stems and cables are illuminated in a host of different colors. The installation is said to have taken over 2,800 hours to design and build in the UK, and a further 3,900 hours to recreate on site.

The effect is to make the otherwise dark 49,000-sq m (527,000-sq ft) area on which the exhibit is installed awash with color, via what look like tall luminous flowers. Visitors to the installation are able to walk around the circular installation, which has a diameter of 250 m (820 ft), and amongst the "flowers." Admission costs from AU$35.

The Field of Light installation opened on April 1st and will run through until March 31st, 2017.

Sources: Bruce Munro, Voyages, Ayers Rock Resort

View gallery - 14 images
4 comments
Keith Reeder
Art? This is as much "art" as what you get from a chimp splashing paint onto a white sheet...
Bob Flint
ART!!! Shameful waste of resources, mockery of mother nature's true prowess...
FollowTheFacts
...I had a somewhat analogous idea twenty years ago – creating a ring of light, utilizing some sort of spotlights, pointed upwards, radio-controlled...and so large and bright enough, that it could be seen from space. I fantasized that the state of Nevada possibly could be used for such a project. The lights would be computer controlled to create waves of lights or any kind of "rhythmic patterns"...a sort of "hello" from Earth to anyone who might see it... So I like this thing done in Australia...heck of an undertaking...much admiration...
dsiple
I'm an artist, and I'd like to know what the aboriginals think about this installation on a place that's sacred to them. Having a hard time with this.