Tiny Houses

Twin treehouse boasts its own skate bowl

Twin treehouse boasts its own ...
Writer and photographer Foster Huntington started work on Cinder Cone back in early 2014
Writer and photographer Foster Huntington started work on Cinder Cone back in early 2014
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Though tiny houses and shelters often pack impressive amenities, it's a safe bet that few could match the Cinder Cone treehouse for having a good time
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Though tiny houses and shelters often pack impressive amenities, it's a safe bet that few could match the Cinder Cone treehouse for having a good time
The lower of the two structures is called the Studio, and serves as Huntington's work space
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The lower of the two structures is called the Studio, and serves as Huntington's work space
Building Cinder Cone took the better part of a year
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Building Cinder Cone took the better part of a year
Though tiny houses and shelters often pack impressive amenities, it's a safe bet that few could match the Cinder Cone treehouse for having a good time
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Though tiny houses and shelters often pack impressive amenities, it's a safe bet that few could match the Cinder Cone treehouse for having a good time
Writer and photographer Foster Huntington started work on Cinder Cone back in early 2014
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Writer and photographer Foster Huntington started work on Cinder Cone back in early 2014
Cinder Cone is based on a rural plot in Skamania County, Washington
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Cinder Cone is based on a rural plot in Skamania County, Washington
Both treehouses are supported by Douglas Fir trees and attached with a Garnier limb
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Both treehouses are supported by Douglas Fir trees and attached with a Garnier limb
Both treehouses are between 30 – 40 ft (9 – 12 m) off the ground
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Both treehouses are between 30 – 40 ft (9 – 12 m) off the ground
The Octagon serves as Huntington's private sleeping quarters
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The Octagon serves as Huntington's private sleeping quarters
Cinder Cone is based on a rural plot in Skamania County, Washington, and apparently didn't come cheap, with the Daily Mail reporting that it cost US$170,000, to build
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Cinder Cone is based on a rural plot in Skamania County, Washington, and apparently didn't come cheap, with the Daily Mail reporting that it cost US$170,000, to build
Below the treehouse buildings lie Huntington's wood-fired tub hot tub and the large concrete skate bowl
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Below the treehouse buildings lie Huntington's wood-fired tub hot tub and the large concrete skate bowl
The hot tub
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The hot tub
Huntington wrote a book detailing Cinder Cone's build, which is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign with just a few days left to run
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Huntington wrote a book detailing Cinder Cone's build, which is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign with just a few days left to run
View gallery - 13 images

Though tiny houses and treehouses often pack impressive amenities, it's a safe bet that few have the Cinder Cone treehouse beat when it comes to having a good time. The recently-completed multi-platform treehouse features a suspension bridge, and boasts both a full-size skate bowl and wood-fired hot tub.

Writer and photographer Foster Huntington started work on Cinder Cone back in early 2014, and with the help of a group of friends it was fully completed within a year. The project actually comprises of two main structures, both of which are attached to Douglas Fir trees with a Garnier limb, a high-strength steel bolt that Huntington reports does relatively little damage to the tree involved.

The lower of the two structures is called the Studio, and serves as Huntington's work space. It includes plenty of shelving, an iMac, a couch, sink, and a wood burning stove. The higher-up Octagon, meanwhile, serves as Huntington's private sleeping quarters.

Below the treehouse buildings lie Huntington's wood-fired tub hot tub and the large concrete skate bowl
Below the treehouse buildings lie Huntington's wood-fired tub hot tub and the large concrete skate bowl

The treehouses are roughly 30 to 40 ft (9 to 12 m) off the ground, and are joined by an interesting ladder/suspension bridge that's supported in the middle by another Douglas Fir. Below the treehouses lie Huntington's wood-fired tub hot tub and the large concrete skate bowl.

Cinder Cone is based on a rural plot in Skamania County, Washington, and apparently didn't come cheap, with the Daily Mail reporting that it cost US$170,000, to build. This figure does not include the land, which belongs to Huntington's family.

Huntington wrote a book detailing Cinder Cone's construction which is currently the subject of a Kickstarter campaign with just a few days left to run. You can also check out the video below for a little more insight into the extraordinary project.

Source: The Cinder Cone

The Cinder Cone

View gallery - 13 images
1 comment
ivan4
As with all these tree houses we are never told about what happens when the wind blows, especially when you have the basic floor attached to two trees and then couple that to a third one and the ground by stairs. Something has got to give and I don't think it will be the trees.