Computers

CompuLab breaks out silent mini computer with a distinctly Minty flavor

CompuLab breaks out silent min...
The MintBox Mini 2 has been developed in collaboration with Linux Mint
The MintBox Mini 2 has been developed in collaboration with Linux Mint
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The MintBox Mini 2 famless computer is compatible with CompuLab's FACET expansion modules, which can add more connectivity and storage
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The MintBox Mini 2 famless computer is compatible with CompuLab's FACET expansion modules, which can add more connectivity and storage
The MintBox Mini 2 uses convection cooling through the all-metal housing
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The MintBox Mini 2 uses convection cooling through the all-metal housing
Connectivity on the MintBox Mini 2 is served up with four USB ports, mini DisplayPort 1.2 and HDMI 1.4, Gigabit Ethernet ports, a microSD slot, a serial port, Bluetooth 4.2 and 802.11ac Wi-Fi
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Connectivity on the MintBox Mini 2 is served up with four USB ports, mini DisplayPort 1.2 and HDMI 1.4, Gigabit Ethernet ports, a microSD slot, a serial port, Bluetooth 4.2 and 802.11ac Wi-Fi
The MinyBox Mini 2 fanless computer can be opened up and components swapped out to suit custom needs
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The MinyBox Mini 2 fanless computer can be opened up and components swapped out to suit custom needs
The MintBox Mini 2 is compact enough to mount on the back of a monitor
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The MintBox Mini 2 is compact enough to mount on the back of a monitor
The MintBox Mini 2 shows that desktop computing doesn't necessarily need to be big, loud and power hungry
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The MintBox Mini 2 shows that desktop computing doesn't necessarily need to be big, loud and power hungry
The Mini 2 is the fourth generation MintBox family model
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The Mini 2 is the fourth generation MintBox family model
The MintBox Mini 2 has been developed in collaboration with Linux Mint
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The MintBox Mini 2 has been developed in collaboration with Linux Mint

Israel's CompuLab has updated its mini computer for lovers of the Linux operating system. Again collaborating with the Linux Mint team, the Mini 2 represents the fourth generation of its MintBox line of small form factor fanless computers for silent operation and plenty of connectivity options.

The particular Linux OS that the Mini 2 was designed to support is the latest Cinnamon flavor of the Mint variety, though it is compatible with other distros, as well as operating systems like Windows 10 or FreeBSD.

Within the all-metal housing of the 112 x 84 x 34 mm (4.4 x 3.3 x 1.3 in), 350 g (12.3 oz) mini computer is quad-core Intel Celeron (Apollo Lake) J3455 processor, which can fire up to 2.3 GHz and rocks Intel HD 500 graphics. The standard version comes with 4 GB of DDR3L RAM and 64 GB of storage, but a Pro model doubles both.

The MintBox Mini 2 shows that desktop computing doesn't necessarily need to be big, loud and power hungry
The MintBox Mini 2 shows that desktop computing doesn't necessarily need to be big, loud and power hungry

As with other members of the CompuLab stable, the MintBox Mini 2 doesn't have any noisy fans whirring away, but uses convection cooling through the all-metal housing to operate in temperatures between 0 and 45° C (32 to 113° F), and in relative humidity of 5 to 95 percent.

Connectivity is served up with two USB 3.0 ports and two USB 2.0, mini DisplayPort 1.2 and HDMI 1.4 that both support 4K monitors, two Gigabit Ethernet ports, a microSD slot for storage expansion, a serial port, Bluetooth 4.2 and 802.11ac Wi-Fi. It's also able to accept CompuLab's FACET cards, which give the Mint 2 more ports, or 4G capabilities, or more SSD storage. And the Mini 2 is compatible with all fitlet2 accessories and add-ons, including the fit-Uptime miniature Li-ion UPS power supply for up to 3 hours of stand-alone use between charges.

The MintBox Mini 2 is available as two models, the standard for US$299 and the Pro for $349. The first shipments are expected to be made by the middle of next month.

Product page: MintBox Mini 2

4 comments
Grunchy
OMG they are gonna put a computer into the keyboard again, EXACTLY like the old C64.
christopher
Looks and priced the same as a QOTOM-Q375G4 except the qotom is 2x faster overall, and almost 3x faster per-core.
MD
Seems ideally suited for running a kick ass NAS (minus the Graphics.)/ home / small office Server.
ljaques
Cute little guy, but at a price. Um, isn't the phrase "rocks Intel HD 500 graphics" a contradiction in terms? Another question is whether there is a need for this product in its current config.